Habilitaron el Casino de Santa Fe, con el 50% de las ...

Which Director had the best run in the 40s?

Best run in terms of anything
William Wyler: The Westerner, The Heiress, The Little Foxes, The Letter, The Best Years of Our Lives, Mrs. Miniver, Memphis Belle, and Thunderbolt.
Orson Welles: Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Macbeth, Journey into Fear, The Stranger, Black Magic, and Follow the Boys.
John Huston: The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Key Largo, We Were Strangers, In This Our Life, Across the Pacific, and Let There Be Light.
Howard Hawks: Red River, I Was a Male War Bride,A Song Is Born, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Sergeant York, His Girl Friday, Air Force, and Ball of Fire.
Alfred Hitchcock: Notorious, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Spellbound, Rope, Suspicion, Under Capricorn, Foreign Correspondent, Saboteur, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Lifeboat, and The Paradine Case.
Preston Sturges: The Palm Beach Story, Sullivan's Travels, Unfaithfully Yours, The Great Moment, The Miracle of Morgan's Creek,I Married a Witch, Christmas in July, The Lady Eve, and The Great McGinty.
George Cukor: The Philadelphia Story, Gaslight, Adam's Rib, Susan and God, Her Cardboard Lover, Keeper of the Flame, Edward, My Son, A Double Life, I'll Be Seeing You, and Desire Me.
John Ford: The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, Tobacco Road, How Green Was My Valley, 3 Godfathers, December 7th: The Movie, My Darling Clementine, They Were Expendable, We Sail at Midnight, Fort Apache, Torpedo Squadron ,The Battle of Midway, How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and The Fugitive.
Jacques Tourneur: Cat People, I Walked With a Zombie, Out of the Past, Canyon Passage, The Leopard Man, Phantom Raiders, Days of Glory, Easy Living, Experiment Perilous, and Berlin Express.
Vittorio De Sica: Shoeshine, Bicycle Thieves, Heart and Soul, The Children Are Watching Us, The Gates of Heaven, A Garibaldian in the Convent, Teresa Venerdì, Maddalena, Zero for Conduct, and Red Roses.
Roberto Rossellini: Rome, Open City, Paisan, Germany, Year Zero, L'Amore, The White Ship, A Pilot Returns, and The Man with a Cross.
Ernst Lubitsch: To Be or Not to Be, The Shop Around the Corner, Heaven Can Wait, Cluny Brown, That Uncertain Feeling, A Royal Scandal, and That Lady in Ermine.
Powell and Pressburger: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Red Shoes, A Canterbury Tale, I Know Where I'm Going!, A Matter of Life and Death, Black Narcissus, Contraband, 49th Parallel, One of Our Aircraft Is Missing, The Small Back Room,and An Airman's Letter to His Mother.
Michael Curtiz: Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Sea Wolf, Yankee Doodle Dandy, This Is the Army, Night and Day, Romance on the High Seas, Santa Fe Trail, Virginia City, The Sea Hawk, Captains of the Clouds, Dive Bomber, Life with Father, Mission to Moscow, Janie, Passage to Marseille, Roughly Speaking, The Unsuspected, My Dream Is Yours, Flamingo Road, and The Lady Takes a Sailor.
John M. Stahl: Leave Her to Heaven, The Foxes of Harrow, The Eve of St. Mark, Our Wife, Immortal Sergeant, Holy Matrimony, The Keys of the Kingdom, The Walls of Jericho, Father Was a Fullback, and Oh, You Beautiful Doll.
Billy Wilder: The Major and the Minor, The Lost Weekend, Double Indemnity, Five Graves to Cairo, Death Mills, The Emperor Waltz, and A Foreign Affair.
Nicholas Ray: They Live by Night, A Roseanna McCoy, Woman's Secret, and Knock on Any Door.
Elia Kazan: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Pinky, Boomerang, The Sea of Grass, and Gentleman's Agreement.
Frank Capra: It’s a Wonderful Life, Arsenic and Old Lace, State of the Union, and Meet John Doe.
Carol Reed: The Third Man, Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, The Stars Look Down, Girl in the News, A Letter from Home, Kipps, The Young Mr. Pitt, Night Train to Munich, The New Lot, and The Way Ahead. David Lean: In Which We Serve, This Happy Breed, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, and The Passionate Friends.
Mervyn LeRoy: Waterloo Bridge, Random Harvest, Little Women, East Side, West Side, Without Reservations, Any Number Can Play, The House I Live In, Madame Curie, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Blossoms in the Dust, Johnny Eager, Escape, and Homecoming.
Vincente Minnelli: Meet Me in St. Louis, I Dood It, Cabin in the Sky, Yolanda and the Thief, The Clock, Undercurrent, Ziegfeld Follies, The Pirate, Madame Bovary, and Till the Clouds Roll By. Charles Walters: Ziegfeld Follies, Easter Parade, Good News, and The Barkleys of Broadway.
Leo McCarey: The Bells of St. Mary's and Once Upon a Honeymoon.
Jean Renoir: The Woman on the Beach, The Southerner, The Diary of a Chambermaid, Swamp Water, and This Land is Mine.
Anthony Mann: Moonlight in Havana, Sing Your Way Home, My Best Gal, Nobody's Darling, Dr. Broadway, Strangers in the Night, Bamboo Blonde, Raw Deal, T-Men, Desperate, Railroaded!, Border Incident, Reign of Terror, Two O'Clock Courage, and Strange Impersonation.
King Vidor: The Fountainhead, On Our Merry Way, Duel in the Sun, An American Romance, Comrade X, Northwest Passage, H. M. Pulham, Esq., and Beyond the Forest.
Robert Rossen: All The King’s Men, Johnny O'Clock, The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, A Child Is Born, Edge of Darkness, Out of the Fog, Blues in the Night, A Walk in the Sun, The Undercover Man, Desert Fury, and Body and Soul.
Fred Zinnemann: The Search, Kid Glove Killer, Eyes in the Night, The Clock, Act of Violence, The Seventh Cross, Little Mister Jim, and My Brother Talks to Horses.
Robert Wise: Criminal Court, The Curse of the Cat People, Mademoiselle Fifi, The Body Snatcher, Born to Kill, The Set-Up, A Game of Death, Blood on the Moon, and Mystery in Mexico.
Akira Kurosawa: Sanshiro Sugata, Sanshiro Sugata Part II, The Most Beautiful, One Wonderful Sunday, Drunken Angel, The Quiet Duel, Stray Dog, The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail, and No Regrets for Our Youth.
Otto Preminger: Laura, Fallen Angel, Daisy Kenyon, Forever Amber, Whirl Pool, The Fan, Margin for Error, In the Meantime, Darling, and Centennial Summer.
Jules Dassin: Thieves' Highway, A Letter for Evie, Brute Force, Two Smart People, The Naked City, Young Ideas, The Canterville Ghost, Nazi Agent, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Affairs of Martha, and Reunion in France.
Charlie Chaplin: The Great Dictator, and Monsieur Verdoux. George Stevens: The More the Merrier, The Talk of the Town, Penny Serenade, Woman of the Year, Vigil in the Night, On Our Merry Way, The Nazi Plan, and I Remember Mama.
Yasujirô Ozu: Late Spring, Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family, A Hen in the Wind, There Was a Father, and Record of a Tenement Gentleman.
Fritz Lang: Secret Beyond the Door, The Woman in the Window, Scarlet Street, Cloak and Dagger, Man Hunt, Ministry of Fear, Hangmen Also Die!, Western Union, Moon Tide, and The Return of Frank James.
Raoul Walsh: High Sierra, White Heat, Colorado Territory, Fighter Squadron, Silver River, Pursued, The Man I Love, Cheyenne, Uncertain Glory, Objective, Burma!, Manpower, Desperate Journey, Northern Pursuit, The Strawberry Blonde, They Died with Their Boots On, Gentleman Jim, Dark Command, and They Drive by Night.
Vincent Sherman: Nora Prentiss, Mr. Skeffington, Adventures of Don Juan, The Unfaithful, The Hard Way, Old Acquaintance, The Hasty Heart, In our Time, Pillow to Post, Janie Gets Married, Saturday's Children, The Man Who Talked Too Much, Underground, Flight from Destiny, Across the Pacific, and All Through the Night.
Anatole Litvak: The Snake Pit, City for Conquest, The Battle of Russia, Why We Fight, Sorry, Wrong Number, This Above All, The Long Night, All This, and Heaven Too, and Castle on the Hudson.
Max Ophüls: Caught, The Reckless Moment, The Exile, Letter from an Unknown Woman, Vendetta, and Sarajevo.
Charles Vidor: Gilda, Cover Girl, Over 21, The Loves of Carmen, The Tuttles of Tahiti, The Desperadoes, Together Again, A Song to Remember, The Man from Colorado, New York Town, Ladies in Retirement, My Son, My Son!, and The Lady in Question.
Edgar G. Ulmer: Detour, Isle of Forgotten Sins, Girls in Chains, Tomorrow We Live, Club Havana, The Strange Woman, My Son, the Hero, Jive Junction, Strange Illusion, Bluebeard, Her Sister's Secret, The Pirates of Capri, Ruthless, The Wife of Monte Cristo, and Carnegie Hall.
Victor Fleming: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Joan of Arc, Adventure, A Guy Named Joe, and Tortilla Flat.
Joseph L. Mankiewicz: A Letter to Three Wives, Escape, House of Strangers, The Late George Apley, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Dragonwyck, and Somewhere in the Night.
Robert Bresson: Angels of Sin and Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne.
Luis Buñuel: Gran Casino and The Great Madcap.
Fei Mu: Spring in a Small Town, Confucius, The Beauty, A Wedding in the Dream, The Magnificent Country, Songs of Ancient China, and The Little Cowheard.
Kenji Mizoguchi: The 47 Ronin, A Woman of Osaka, Flame of My Love, The Love of the Actress Sumako, Victory Song, Utamaro and His Five Women, Women of the Night, Victory of Women, The Famous Sword Bijomaru, Three Generations of Danjuro, The Life of an Actor, and Miyamoto Musashi.
Douglas Sirk: Lured, Sleep, My Love, Hitler's Madman, Summer Storm, A Scandal in Paris, Shockproof, and Slightly French.
René Clément: The Battle of the Rails, The Damned, Mr. Orchid, and The Walls of Malapaga.
Robert Hamer: Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Spider and the Fly, It Always Rains on Sunday, San Demetrio London, and Pink String and Sealing Wax.
Robert Siodmak: Criss Cross, Cry of The City, Dark Mirror, Phantom Lady, The Killers, The Spiral Staircase, Christmas Holiday, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, Time Out of Mind, Son of Dracula, The Suspect, The Night Before the Divorce, Someone to Remember, Cobra Woman, The File on Thelma Jordon, The Great Sinner, West Point Widow, My Heart Belongs to Daddy, and Fly-by-Night.
Humphrey Jennings: Spring Offensive, Welfare of the Workers, London Can Take It!, A Diary for Timothy, This Is England, Words for Battle, Fires Were Started, Listen to Britain, The Silent Village, The True Story of Lili Marlene, The Eighty Days, Myra Hess, A Defeated People, The Cumberland Story, and The Dim Little Island.
William Dieterle: Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet, Kismet, This Love of Ours, Syncopation, The Searching Wind, Rope of Sand, Portrait of Jennie, The Accused, I'll Be Seeing You, A Dispatch from Reuters, The Devil and Daniel Webster, Tennessee Johnson, and Love Letters.
Edmund Goulding: The Razor's Edge, Nightmare Alley, The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, Everybody Does It, Claudia, Of Human Bondage, Flight from Folly, Forever and a Day, Old Acquaintance, The Constant Nymph, The Great Lie, and Til We Meet Again.
Luchino Visconti: Ossessione and La Terra Trema.
Ernest B. Schoedsack: Dr. Cyclops and Mighty Joe Young.
Roy Del Ruth: It Happened on 5th Avenue, Red Light, The Babe Ruth Story, The Chocolate Soldier, Topper Returns, He Married His Wife, Du Barry Was a Lady, and Ziegfeld Follies.
Rene Clair: And Then There Were None, I Married a Witch, Man About Town,It Happened Tomorrow, The Flame of New Orleans, and Forever and a Day.
John Cromwell: Victory, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, So Ends Our Night, Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake, Anna and the King of Siam, Dead Reckoning, The Enchanted Cottage, Since You Went Away, and Night Song.
Richard Fleischer: Trapped, Make Mine Laughs, The Clay Pigeon, Follow Me Quietly, Banjo, Design for Death, So This Is New York, Bodyguard, and Child of Divorce.
Norman Z. McLeod: Jackass Mail, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Panama Hattie, The Paleface, and Little Men.
submitted by Britneyfan456 to movies [link] [comments]

Which Director had the best run in the 40s?

Best run in terms of anything
William Wyler: The Westerner, The Heiress, The Little Foxes, The Letter, The Best Years of Our Lives, Mrs. Miniver, Memphis Belle, and Thunderbolt.
Orson Welles: Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Macbeth, Journey into Fear, The Stranger, Black Magic, and Follow the Boys.
John Huston: The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Key Largo, We Were Strangers, In This Our Life, Across the Pacific, and Let There Be Light.
Howard Hawks: Red River, I Was a Male War Bride,A Song Is Born, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Sergeant York, His Girl Friday, Air Force, and Ball of Fire.
Alfred Hitchcock: Notorious, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Spellbound, Rope, Suspicion, Under Capricorn, Foreign Correspondent, Saboteur, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Lifeboat, and The Paradine Case.
Preston Sturges: The Palm Beach Story, Sullivan's Travels, Unfaithfully Yours, The Great Moment, The Miracle of Morgan's Creek,I Married a Witch, Christmas in July, The Lady Eve, and The Great McGinty.
George Cukor: The Philadelphia Story, Gaslight, Adam's Rib, Susan and God, Her Cardboard Lover, Keeper of the Flame, Edward, My Son, A Double Life, I'll Be Seeing You, and Desire Me.
John Ford: The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, Tobacco Road, How Green Was My Valley, 3 Godfathers, December 7th: The Movie, My Darling Clementine, They Were Expendable, We Sail at Midnight, Fort Apache, Torpedo Squadron ,The Battle of Midway, How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and The Fugitive.
Jacques Tourneur: Cat People, I Walked With a Zombie, Out of the Past, Canyon Passage, The Leopard Man, Phantom Raiders, Days of Glory, Easy Living, Experiment Perilous, and Berlin Express.
Vittorio De Sica: Shoeshine, Bicycle Thieves, Heart and Soul, The Children Are Watching Us, The Gates of Heaven, A Garibaldian in the Convent, Teresa Venerdì, Maddalena, Zero for Conduct, and Red Roses.
Roberto Rossellini: Rome, Open City, Paisan, Germany, Year Zero, L'Amore, The White Ship, A Pilot Returns, and The Man with a Cross.
Ernst Lubitsch: To Be or Not to Be, The Shop Around the Corner, Heaven Can Wait, Cluny Brown, That Uncertain Feeling, A Royal Scandal, and That Lady in Ermine.
Powell and Pressburger: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Red Shoes, A Canterbury Tale, I Know Where I'm Going!, A Matter of Life and Death, Black Narcissus, Contraband, 49th Parallel, One of Our Aircraft Is Missing,The Small Back Room, and An Airman's Letter to His Mother.
Michael Curtiz: Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Sea Wolf, Yankee Doodle Dandy, This Is the Army, Night and Day, Romance on the High Seas, Santa Fe Trail, Virginia City, The Sea Hawk, Captains of the Clouds, Dive Bomber, Life with Father, Mission to Moscow, Janie, Passage to Marseille, Roughly Speaking, The Unsuspected, My Dream Is Yours, Flamingo Road, and The Lady Takes a Sailor.
John M. Stahl: Leave Her to Heaven, The Foxes of Harrow, The Eve of St. Mark, Our Wife, Immortal Sergeant, Holy Matrimony, The Keys of the Kingdom, The Walls of Jericho, Father Was a Fullback, and Oh, You Beautiful Doll.
Billy Wilder: The Major and the Minor, The Lost Weekend, Double Indemnity, Five Graves to Cairo, Death Mills, The Emperor Waltz, and A Foreign Affair.
Nicholas Ray: They Live by Night, A Roseanna McCoy, Woman's Secret, and Knock on Any Door.
Elia Kazan: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Pinky, Boomerang, The Sea of Grass, and Gentleman's Agreement.
Frank Capra: It’s a Wonderful Life, Arsenic and Old Lace, State of the Union, and Meet John Doe.
Carol Reed: The Third Man, Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, The Stars Look Down, Girl in the News, A Letter from Home, Kipps, The Young Mr. Pitt, Night Train to Munich, The New Lot, and The Way Ahead.
David Lean: In Which We Serve, This Happy Breed, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, and The Passionate Friends.
Mervyn LeRoy: Waterloo Bridge, Random Harvest, Little Women, East Side, West Side, Without Reservations, Any Number Can Play, The House I Live In, Madame Curie, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Blossoms in the Dust, Johnny Eager, Escape, and Homecoming.
Vincente Minnelli: Meet Me in St. Louis, I Dood It, Cabin in the Sky, Yolanda and the Thief, The Clock, Undercurrent, Ziegfeld Follies, The Pirate, Madame Bovary, and Till the Clouds Roll By.
Charles Walters: Ziegfeld Follies, Easter Parade, Good News, and The Barkleys of Broadway.
Leo McCarey: The Bells of St. Mary's and Once Upon a Honeymoon.
Jean Renoir: The Woman on the Beach, The Southerner, The Diary of a Chambermaid, Swamp Water, and This Land is Mine.
Anthony Mann: Moonlight in Havana, Sing Your Way Home, My Best Gal, Nobody's Darling, Dr. Broadway, Strangers in the Night, Bamboo Blonde, Raw Deal, T-Men, Desperate, Railroaded!, Border Incident, Reign of Terror, Two O'Clock Courage, and Strange Impersonation.
King Vidor: The Fountainhead, On Our Merry Way, Duel in the Sun, An American Romance, Comrade X, Northwest Passage, H. M. Pulham, Esq., and Beyond the Forest.
Robert Rossen: All The King’s Men, Johnny O'Clock, The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, A Child Is Born, Edge of Darkness, Out of the Fog, Blues in the Night, A Walk in the Sun, The Undercover Man, Desert Fury, and Body and Soul.
Fred Zinnemann: The Search, Kid Glove Killer, Eyes in the Night, The Clock, Act of Violence, The Seventh Cross, Little Mister Jim, and My Brother Talks to Horses.
Robert Wise: Criminal Court, The Curse of the Cat People, Mademoiselle Fifi, The Body Snatcher, Born to Kill, The Set-Up, A Game of Death, Blood on the Moon, and Mystery in Mexico.
Akira Kurosawa: Sanshiro Sugata, Sanshiro Sugata Part II, The Most Beautiful, One Wonderful Sunday, Drunken Angel, The Quiet Duel, Stray Dog, The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail, and No Regrets for Our Youth.
Otto Preminger: Laura, Fallen Angel, Daisy Kenyon, Forever Amber, Whirl Pool, The Fan, Margin for Error, In the Meantime, Darling, and Centennial Summer.
Jules Dassin: Thieves' Highway, A Letter for Evie, Brute Force, Two Smart People, The Naked City, Young Ideas, The Canterville Ghost, Nazi Agent, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Affairs of Martha, and Reunion in France.
Charlie Chaplin: The Great Dictator, and Monsieur Verdoux. George Stevens: The More the Merrier, The Talk of the Town, Penny Serenade, Woman of the Year, Vigil in the Night, On Our Merry Way, The Nazi Plan, and I Remember Mama.
Yasujirô Ozu: Late Spring, Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family, A Hen in the Wind, There Was a Father, and Record of a Tenement Gentleman.
Fritz Lang: Secret Beyond the Door, The Woman in the Window, Scarlet Street, Cloak and Dagger, Man Hunt, Ministry of Fear, Hangmen Also Die!, Western Union, Moon Tide, and The Return of Frank James.
Raoul Walsh: High Sierra, White Heat, Colorado Territory, Fighter Squadron, Silver River, Pursued, The Man I Love, Cheyenne, Uncertain Glory, Objective, Burma!, Manpower, Desperate Journey, Northern Pursuit, The Strawberry Blonde, They Died with Their Boots On, Gentleman Jim, Dark Command, and They Drive by Night.
Vincent Sherman: Nora Prentiss, Mr. Skeffington, Adventures of Don Juan, The Unfaithful, The Hard Way, Old Acquaintance, The Hasty Heart, In our Time, Pillow to Post, Janie Gets Married, Saturday's Children, The Man Who Talked Too Much, Underground, Flight from Destiny, Across the Pacific, and All Through the Night.
Anatole Litvak: The Snake Pit, City for Conquest, The Battle of Russia, Why We Fight, Sorry, Wrong Number, This Above All, The Long Night, All This, and Heaven Too, and Castle on the Hudson.
Max Ophüls: Caught, The Reckless Moment, The Exile, Letter from an Unknown Woman, Vendetta, and Sarajevo.
Charles Vidor: Gilda, Cover Girl, Over 21, The Loves of Carmen, The Tuttles of Tahiti, The Desperadoes, Together Again, A Song to Remember, The Man from Colorado, New York Town, Ladies in Retirement, My Son, My Son!, and The Lady in Question.
Edgar G. Ulmer: Detour, Isle of Forgotten Sins, Girls in Chains, Tomorrow We Live, Club Havana, The Strange Woman, My Son, the Hero, Jive Junction, Strange Illusion, Bluebeard, Her Sister's Secret, The Pirates of Capri, Ruthless, The Wife of Monte Cristo, and Carnegie Hall.
Victor Fleming: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Joan of Arc, Adventure, A Guy Named Joe, and Tortilla Flat.
Joseph L. Mankiewicz: A Letter to Three Wives, Escape, House of Strangers, The Late George Apley, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Dragonwyck, and Somewhere in the Night.
Robert Bresson: Angels of Sin and Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne.
Luis Buñuel: Gran Casino and The Great Madcap.
Fei Mu: Spring in a Small Town, Confucius, The Beauty, A Wedding in the Dream, The Magnificent Country, Songs of Ancient China, and The Little Cowheard.
Kenji Mizoguchi: The 47 Ronin, A Woman of Osaka, Flame of My Love, The Love of the Actress Sumako, Victory Song, Utamaro and His Five Women, Women of the Night, Victory of Women, The Famous Sword Bijomaru, Three Generations of Danjuro, The Life of an Actor, and Miyamoto Musashi.
Douglas Sirk: Lured, Sleep, My Love, Hitler's Madman, Summer Storm, A Scandal in Paris, Shockproof, and Slightly French.
René Clément: The Battle of the Rails, The Damned, Mr. Orchid, and The Walls of Malapaga.
Robert Hamer: Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Spider and the Fly, It Always Rains on Sunday, San Demetrio London, and Pink String and Sealing Wax.
Robert Siodmak: Criss Cross, Cry of The City, Dark Mirror, Phantom Lady, The Killers, The Spiral Staircase, Christmas Holiday, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, Time Out of Mind, Son of Dracula, The Suspect, The Night Before the Divorce, Someone to Remember, Cobra Woman, The File on Thelma Jordon, The Great Sinner, West Point Widow, My Heart Belongs to Daddy, and Fly-by-Night.
Humphrey Jennings: Spring Offensive, Welfare of the Workers, London Can Take It!, A Diary for Timothy, This Is England, Words for Battle, Fires Were Started, Listen to Britain, The Silent Village, The True Story of Lili Marlene, The Eighty Days, Myra Hess, A Defeated People, The Cumberland Story, and The Dim Little Island.
William Dieterle: Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet, Kismet, This Love of Ours, Syncopation, The Searching Wind, Rope of Sand, Portrait of Jennie, The Accused, I'll Be Seeing You, A Dispatch from Reuters, The Devil and Daniel Webster, Tennessee Johnson, and Love Letters.
Edmund Goulding: The Razor's Edge, Nightmare Alley, The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, Everybody Does It, Claudia, Of Human Bondage, Flight from Folly, Forever and a Day, Old Acquaintance, The Constant Nymph, The Great Lie, and Til We Meet Again.
Luchino Visconti: Ossessione and La Terra Trema.
Ernest B. Schoedsack: Dr. Cyclops and Mighty Joe Young.
Roy Del Ruth: It Happened on 5th Avenue, Red Light, The Babe Ruth Story, The Chocolate Soldier, Topper Returns, He Married His Wife, Du Barry Was a Lady, and Ziegfeld Follies.
Rene Clair: And Then There Were None, I Married a Witch, Man About Town,It Happened Tomorrow, The Flame of New Orleans, and Forever and a Day.
John Cromwell: Victory, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, So Ends Our Night, Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake, Anna and the King of Siam, Dead Reckoning, The Enchanted Cottage, Since You Went Away, and Night Song.
Richard Fleischer: Trapped, Make Mine Laughs, The Clay Pigeon, Follow Me Quietly, Banjo, Design for Death, So This Is New York, Bodyguard, and Child of Divorce.
Norman Z. McLeod: Jackass Mail, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Panama Hattie, The Paleface, and Little Men.
submitted by Britneyfan456 to flicks [link] [comments]

[Resumen Semanal XII] Los bonos de Guzmán y el impuesto al viento | USD a 172

Hola, y bienvenidos al Resumen Semanal de noticias Número 12, correspondiente a la segunda semana de noviembre de 2020.
Antes de comenzar queremos agradecer a Osvaldo por esos cafecitos.
TL;DR: video en youtube.
SÁBADO:
DOMINGO:
LUNES:
MARTES:
MIÉRCOLES:
JUEVES:
VIERNES:
Cerramos el resumen con los números de la pandemia:
Si les ha gustado este resumen les agradecemos por sus comentarios y compartidas. Como ya lo hemos dicho no hacemos esto con fines de lucro, pero si alguno quiere hacernos una donación por cafecitos será más que bienvenida. Muchas gracias por todo.
Chao.
submitted by guillepaez to RepArgentina [link] [comments]

Which Director had the best run in the 40s?

Best run in terms of anything
William Wyler: The Westerner, The Heiress, The Little Foxes, The Letter, The Best Years of Our Lives, Mrs. Miniver, Memphis Belle, and Thunderbolt.
Orson Welles: Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Macbeth, Journey into Fear, The Stranger, Black Magic, and Follow the Boys.
John Huston: The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Key Largo, We Were Strangers, In This Our Life, Across the Pacific, and Let There Be Light.
Howard Hawks: Red River, I Was a Male War Bride,A Song Is Born, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Sergeant York, His Girl Friday, Air Force, and Ball of Fire.
Alfred Hitchcock: Notorious, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Spellbound, Rope, Suspicion, Under Capricorn, Foreign Correspondent, Saboteur, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Lifeboat, and The Paradine Case.
Preston Sturges: The Palm Beach Story, Sullivan's Travels, Unfaithfully Yours, The Great Moment, The Miracle of Morgan's Creek,I Married a Witch, Christmas in July, The Lady Eve, and The Great McGinty.
George Cukor: The Philadelphia Story, Gaslight, Adam's Rib, Susan and God, Her Cardboard Lover, Keeper of the Flame, Edward, My Son, A Double Life, I'll Be Seeing You, and Desire Me.
John Ford: The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, Tobacco Road, How Green Was My Valley, We Sail at Midnight, Sex Hygiene, 3 Godfathers, My Darling Clementine, Torpedo Squadron,December 7th: The Movie,They Were Expendable, Fort Apache, The Battle of Midway, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and The Fugitive.
Jacques Tourneur: Cat People, I Walked With a Zombie, Out of the Past, Canyon Passage, The Leopard Man, Phantom Raiders, Days of Glory, Easy Living, Experiment Perilous, and Berlin Express.
Vittorio De Sica: Shoeshine, Bicycle Thieves, Heart and Soul, The Children Are Watching Us, The Gates of Heaven, A Garibaldian in the Convent, Teresa Venerdì, Maddalena, Zero for Conduct, and Red Roses.
Roberto Rossellini: Rome, Open City, Paisan, Germany, Year Zero, L'Amore, The White Ship, A Pilot Returns, and The Man with a Cross.
Ernst Lubitsch: To Be or Not to Be, The Shop Around the Corner, Heaven Can Wait, Cluny Brown, That Uncertain Feeling, A Royal Scandal, and That Lady in Ermine.
Powell and Pressburger: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Red Shoes, A Canterbury Tale, I Know Where I'm Going!, A Matter of Life and Death, Black Narcissus, Contraband, 49th Parallel, One of Our Aircraft Is Missing,The Small Back Room,and An Airman's Letter to His Mother.
Michael Curtiz: Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Sea Wolf, Yankee Doodle Dandy, This Is the Army, Night and Day, Romance on the High Seas, Santa Fe Trail, Virginia City, The Sea Hawk, Captains of the Clouds, Dive Bomber, Life with Father, Mission to Moscow, Janie, Passage to Marseille, Roughly Speaking, The Unsuspected, My Dream Is Yours, Flamingo Road, and The Lady Takes a Sailor.
John M. Stahl: Leave Her to Heaven, The Foxes of Harrow, The Eve of St. Mark, Our Wife, Immortal Sergeant, Holy Matrimony, The Keys of the Kingdom, The Walls of Jericho, Father Was a Fullback, and Oh, You Beautiful Doll.
Billy Wilder: The Major and the Minor, The Lost Weekend, Double Indemnity, Five Graves to Cairo, Death Mills, The Emperor Waltz, and A Foreign Affair.
Nicholas Ray: They Live by Night, A Woman's Secret, and Knock on Any Door.
Elia Kazan: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Pinky, Boomerang, The Sea of Grass, and Gentleman's Agreement.
Frank Capra: It’s a Wonderful Life, Arsenic and Old Lace, State of the Union, and Meet John Doe.
Carol Reed: The Third Man, Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, The Stars Look Down, Girl in the News, A Letter from Home, Kipps, The Young Mr. Pitt, Night Train to Munich, The New Lot, and The Way Ahead.
David Lean: In Which We Serve, This Happy Breed, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, and The Passionate Friends.
Mervyn LeRoy: Waterloo Bridge, Random Harvest, Little Women, East Side, West Side, Without Reservations, Any Number Can Play, The House I Live In, Madame Curie, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Blossoms in the Dust, Johnny Eager, Escape, and Homecoming.
Vincente Minnelli: Meet Me in St. Louis, I Dood It, Cabin in the Sky, Yolanda and the Thief, The Clock, Undercurrent, Ziegfeld Follies, The Pirate, Madame Bovary, and Till the Clouds Roll By.
Charles Walters: Ziegfeld Follies, Easter Parade, Good News, and The Barkleys of Broadway.
Leo McCarey: The Bells of St. Mary's and Once Upon a Honeymoon.
Jean Renoir: The Woman on the Beach, The Southerner, The Diary of a Chambermaid, Swamp Water, and This Land is Mine.
Anthony Mann: Moonlight in Havana, Sing Your Way Home, My Best Gal, Nobody's Darling, Dr. Broadway, Strangers in the Night, Bamboo Blonde, Raw Deal, T-Men, Desperate, Railroaded!, Border Incident, Reign of Terror, Two O'Clock Courage, and Strange Impersonation.
King Vidor: The Fountainhead, On Our Merry Way, Duel in the Sun, An American Romance, Comrade X, Northwest Passage, H. M. Pulham, Esq., and Beyond the Forest.
Robert Rossen: All The King’s Men, Johnny O'Clock, The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, A Child Is Born, Edge of Darkness, Out of the Fog, Blues in the Night, A Walk in the Sun, The Undercover Man, Desert Fury, and Body and Soul.
Fred Zinnemann: The Search, Kid Glove Killer, Eyes in the Night, The Clock, Act of Violence, The Seventh Cross, Little Mister Jim, and My Brother Talks to Horses.
Robert Wise: Criminal Court, The Curse of the Cat People, Mademoiselle Fifi, The Body Snatcher, Born to Kill, The Set-Up, A Game of Death, Blood on the Moon, and Mystery in Mexico.
Akira Kurosawa: Sanshiro Sugata, Sanshiro Sugata Part II, The Most Beautiful, One Wonderful Sunday, Drunken Angel, The Quiet Duel, Stray Dog, The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail, and No Regrets for Our Youth.
Otto Preminger: Laura, Fallen Angel, Daisy Kenyon, Forever Amber, Whirl Pool, The Fan, Margin for Error, In the Meantime, Darling, and Centennial Summer.
Jules Dassin: Thieves' Highway, A Letter for Evie, Brute Force, Two Smart People, The Naked City, Young Ideas, The Canterville Ghost, Nazi Agent, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Affairs of Martha, and Reunion in France.
Charlie Chaplin: The Great Dictator, and Monsieur Verdoux.
George Stevens: The More the Merrier, The Talk of the Town, Penny Serenade, Woman of the Year, Vigil in the Night, On Our Merry Way, The Nazi Plan, and I Remember Mama.
Yasujirô Ozu: Late Spring, Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family, A Hen in the Wind, There Was a Father, and Record of a Tenement Gentleman.
Fritz Lang: Secret Beyond the Door, The Woman in the Window, Scarlet Street, Cloak and Dagger, Man Hunt, Ministry of Fear, Hangmen Also Die!, Western Union, Moon Tide, and The Return of Frank James.
Raoul Walsh: High Sierra, White Heat, Colorado Territory, Fighter Squadron, Silver River, Pursued, The Man I Love, Cheyenne, Uncertain Glory, Objective, Burma!, Manpower, Desperate Journey, Northern Pursuit, The Strawberry Blonde, They Died with Their Boots On, Gentleman Jim, Dark Command, and They Drive by Night.
Vincent Sherman: Nora Prentiss, Mr. Skeffington, Adventures of Don Juan, The Unfaithful, The Hard Way, Old Acquaintance, The Hasty Heart, In our Time, Pillow to Post, Janie Gets Married, Saturday's Children, The Man Who Talked Too Much, Underground, Flight from Destiny, Across the Pacific, and All Through the Night.
Anatole Litvak: The Snake Pit, City for Conquest, The Battle of Russia, Why We Fight, Sorry, Wrong Number, This Above All, The Long Night, All This, and Heaven Too, and Castle on the Hudson.
Max Ophüls: Caught, The Reckless Moment, The Exile, Letter from an Unknown Woman, Vendetta, and Sarajevo.
Charles Vidor: Gilda, Cover Girl, Over 21, The Loves of Carmen, The Tuttles of Tahiti, The Desperadoes, Together Again, A Song to Remember, The Man from Colorado, New York Town, Ladies in Retirement, My Son, My Son!, and The Lady in Question.
Edgar G. Ulmer: Detour, Isle of Forgotten Sins, Girls in Chains, Tomorrow We Live, Club Havana, The Strange Woman, My Son, the Hero, Jive Junction, Strange Illusion, Bluebeard, Her Sister's Secret, The Pirates of Capri, Ruthless, The Wife of Monte Cristo, and Carnegie Hall.
Maya Daren: At Land, Meshes of the Afternoon, A Study for Choreography for Camera, Ritual in Transfigured Time, and Meditation on Violence.
Victor Fleming: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Joan of Arc, Adventure, A Guy Named Joe, and Tortilla Flat.
Joseph L. Mankiewicz: A Letter to Three Wives, Escape, House of Strangers, The Late George Apley, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Dragonwyck, and Somewhere in the Night.
Robert Bresson: Angels of Sin and Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne.
Luis Buñuel: Gran Casino and The Great Madcap.
Fei Mu: Spring in a Small Town, Confucius, The Beauty, A Wedding in the Dream, The Magnificent Country, Songs of Ancient China, and The Little Cowheard.
Kenji Mizoguchi: The 47 Ronin, A Woman of Osaka, Flame of My Love, The Love of the Actress Sumako, Victory Song, Utamaro and His Five Women, Women of the Night, Victory of Women, The Famous Sword Bijomaru, Three Generations of Danjuro, The Life of an Actor, and Miyamoto Musashi.
Douglas Sirk: Lured, Sleep, My Love, Hitler's Madman, Summer Storm, A Scandal in Paris, Shockproof, and Slightly French.
René Clément: The Battle of the Rails, The Damned, Mr. Orchid, and The Walls of Malapaga.
Robert Hamer: Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Spider and the Fly, It Always Rains on Sunday, San Demetrio London, and Pink String and Sealing Wax.
Robert Siodmak: Criss Cross, Cry of The City, Dark Mirror, Phantom Lady, The Killers, The Spiral Staircase, Christmas Holiday, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, Time Out of Mind, Son of Dracula, The Suspect, The Night Before the Divorce, Someone to Remember, Cobra Woman, The File on Thelma Jordon, The Great Sinner, West Point Widow, My Heart Belongs to Daddy, and Fly-by-Night.
Humphrey Jennings: Spring Offensive, Welfare of the Workers, London Can Take It!, A Diary for Timothy, This Is England, Words for Battle, Fires Were Started, Listen to Britain, The Silent Village, The True Story of Lili Marlene, The Eighty Days, Myra Hess, A Defeated People, The Cumberland Story, and The Dim Little Island.
William Dieterle: Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet, Kismet, This Love of Ours, Syncopation, The Searching Wind, Rope of Sand, Portrait of Jennie, The Accused, I'll Be Seeing You, A Dispatch from Reuters, The Devil and Daniel Webster, Tennessee Johnson, and Love Letters.
Edmund Goulding: The Razor's Edge, Nightmare Alley, The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, Everybody Does It, Claudia, Of Human Bondage, Flight from Folly, Forever and a Day, Old Acquaintance, The Constant Nymph, The Great Lie, and Til We Meet Again.
Luchino Visconti: Ossessione and La Terra Trema.
Ernest B. Schoedsack: Dr. Cyclops and Mighty Joe Young.
Roy Del Ruth: It Happened on 5th Avenue, Red Light, The Babe Ruth Story, The Chocolate Soldier, Topper Returns, He Married His Wife, Du Barry Was a Lady, and Ziegfeld Follies.
Rene Clair: And Then There Were None, I Married a Witch, Man About Town,It Happened Tomorrow, The Flame of New Orleans, and Forever and a Day.
John Cromwell: Victory, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, So Ends Our Night, Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake, Anna and the King of Siam, Dead Reckoning, The Enchanted Cottage, Since You Went Away, and Night Song.
Richard Fleischer: Trapped, Make Mine Laughs, The Clay Pigeon, Follow Me Quietly, Banjo, Design for Death, So This Is New York, Bodyguard, and Child of Divorce.
Norman Z. McLeod: Jackass Mail, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Panama Hattie, The Paleface, and Little Men.
submitted by Britneyfan456 to criterion [link] [comments]

Which Director had the best run in the 40s?

Best run in terms of anything
William Wyler: The Westerner, The Heiress, The Little Foxes, The Letter, The Best Years of Our Lives, Mrs. Miniver, Memphis Belle, and Thunderbolt.
Orson Welles: Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Lady from Shanghai, Macbeth, Journey into Fear,The Stranger, Black Magic, and Follow the Boys.
John Huston: The Maltese Falcon, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Key Largo, We Were Strangers, In This Our Life, Across the Pacific, and Let There Be Light.
Howard Hawks: Red River, I Was a Male War Bride,A Song Is Born, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Sergeant York, His Girl Friday, Air Force, and Ball of Fire.
Alfred Hitchcock: Notorious, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Spellbound, Rope, Suspicion, Under Capricorn, Foreign Correspondent, Saboteur, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Lifeboat, and The Paradine Case.
Preston Sturges: The Palm Beach Story, Sullivan's Travels, Unfaithfully Yours, The Great Moment, The Miracle of Morgan's Creek,I Married a Witch, Christmas in July, The Lady Eve, and The Great McGinty.
George Cukor: The Philadelphia Story, Gaslight, Adam's Rib, Susan and God, Her Cardboard Lover, Keeper of the Flame, Edward, My Son, A Double Life, I'll Be Seeing You, and Desire Me.
John Ford: The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, Tobacco Road, How Green Was My Valley, 3 Godfathers, December 7th: The Movie, My Darling Clementine, They Were Expendable, We Sail at Midnight, Fort Apache, Torpedo Squadron ,The Battle of Midway, How to Operate Behind Enemy Lines, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and The Fugitive.
Jacques Tourneur: Cat People, I Walked With a Zombie, Out of the Past, Canyon Passage, The Leopard Man, Phantom Raiders, Days of Glory, Easy Living, Experiment Perilous, and Berlin Express.
Vittorio De Sica: Shoeshine, Bicycle Thieves, Heart and Soul, The Children Are Watching Us, The Gates of Heaven, A Garibaldian in the Convent, Teresa Venerdì, Maddalena, Zero for Conduct, and Red Roses.
Roberto Rossellini: Rome, Open City, Paisan, Germany, Year Zero, L'Amore, The White Ship, A Pilot Returns, and The Man with a Cross.
Ernst Lubitsch: To Be or Not to Be, The Shop Around the Corner, Heaven Can Wait, Cluny Brown, That Uncertain Feeling, A Royal Scandal, and That Lady in Ermine.
Powell and Pressburger: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, The Red Shoes, A Canterbury Tale, I Know Where I'm Going!, A Matter of Life and Death, Black Narcissus, Contraband, 49th Parallel, One of Our Aircraft Is Missing, The Small Back Room, and An Airman's Letter to His Mother.
Michael Curtiz: Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, The Sea Wolf, Yankee Doodle Dandy, This Is the Army, Night and Day, Romance on the High Seas, Santa Fe Trail, Virginia City, The Sea Hawk, Captains of the Clouds, Dive Bomber, Life with Father, Mission to Moscow, Janie, Passage to Marseille, Roughly Speaking, The Unsuspected, My Dream Is Yours, Flamingo Road, and The Lady Takes a Sailor.
John M. Stahl: Leave Her to Heaven, The Foxes of Harrow, The Eve of St. Mark, Our Wife, Immortal Sergeant, Holy Matrimony, The Keys of the Kingdom, The Walls of Jericho, Father Was a Fullback, and Oh, You Beautiful Doll.
Billy Wilder: The Major and the Minor, The Lost Weekend, Double Indemnity, Five Graves to Cairo, Death Mills, The Emperor Waltz, and A Foreign Affair.
Nicholas Ray: They Live by Night, A Roseanna McCoy, Woman's Secret, and Knock on Any Door.
Elia Kazan: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Pinky, Boomerang, The Sea of Grass, and Gentleman's Agreement.
Frank Capra: It’s a Wonderful Life, Arsenic and Old Lace, State of the Union, and Meet John Doe.
Carol Reed: The Third Man, Odd Man Out, The Fallen Idol, The Stars Look Down, Girl in the News, A Letter from Home, Kipps, The Young Mr. Pitt, Night Train to Munich, The New Lot, and The Way Ahead.
David Lean: In Which We Serve, This Happy Breed, Brief Encounter, Blithe Spirit, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, and The Passionate Friends.
Mervyn LeRoy: Waterloo Bridge, Random Harvest, Little Women, East Side, West Side, Without Reservations, Any Number Can Play, The House I Live In, Madame Curie, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, Blossoms in the Dust, Johnny Eager, Escape, and Homecoming.
Vincente Minnelli: Meet Me in St. Louis, I Dood It, Cabin in the Sky, Yolanda and the Thief, The Clock, Undercurrent, Ziegfeld Follies, The Pirate, Madame Bovary, and Till the Clouds Roll By.
Charles Walters: Ziegfeld Follies, Easter Parade, Good News, and The Barkleys of Broadway.
Leo McCarey: The Bells of St. Mary's and Once Upon a Honeymoon.
Jean Renoir: The Woman on the Beach, The Southerner, The Diary of a Chambermaid, Swamp Water, and This Land is Mine.
Anthony Mann: Moonlight in Havana, Sing Your Way Home, My Best Gal, Nobody's Darling, Dr. Broadway, Strangers in the Night, Bamboo Blonde, Raw Deal, T-Men, Desperate, Railroaded!, Border Incident, Reign of Terror, Two O'Clock Courage, and Strange Impersonation.
King Vidor: The Fountainhead, On Our Merry Way, Duel in the Sun, An American Romance, Comrade X, Northwest Passage, H. M. Pulham, Esq., and Beyond the Forest.
Robert Rossen: All The King’s Men, Johnny O'Clock, The Strange Love of Martha Ivers, A Child Is Born, Edge of Darkness, Out of the Fog, Blues in the Night, A Walk in the Sun, The Undercover Man, Desert Fury, and Body and Soul.
Fred Zinnemann: The Search, Kid Glove Killer, Eyes in the Night, The Clock, Act of Violence, The Seventh Cross, Little Mister Jim, and My Brother Talks to Horses.
Robert Wise: Criminal Court, The Curse of the Cat People, Mademoiselle Fifi, The Body Snatcher, Born to Kill, The Set-Up, A Game of Death, Blood on the Moon, and Mystery in Mexico.
Akira Kurosawa: Sanshiro Sugata, Sanshiro Sugata Part II, The Most Beautiful, One Wonderful Sunday, Drunken Angel, The Quiet Duel, Stray Dog, The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail, and No Regrets for Our Youth.
Otto Preminger: Laura, Fallen Angel, Daisy Kenyon, Forever Amber, Whirl Pool, The Fan, Margin for Error, In the Meantime, Darling, and Centennial Summer.
Jules Dassin: Thieves' Highway, A Letter for Evie, Brute Force, Two Smart People, The Naked City, Young Ideas, The Canterville Ghost, Nazi Agent, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Affairs of Martha, and Reunion in France.
Charlie Chaplin: The Great Dictator, and Monsieur Verdoux. George Stevens: The More the Merrier, The Talk of the Town, Penny Serenade, Woman of the Year, Vigil in the Night, On Our Merry Way, The Nazi Plan, and I Remember Mama.
Yasujirô Ozu: Late Spring, Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family, A Hen in the Wind, There Was a Father, and Record of a Tenement Gentleman.
Fritz Lang: Secret Beyond the Door, The Woman in the Window, Scarlet Street, Cloak and Dagger, Man Hunt, Ministry of Fear, Hangmen Also Die!, Western Union, Moon Tide, and The Return of Frank James.
Raoul Walsh: High Sierra, White Heat, Colorado Territory, Fighter Squadron, Silver River, Pursued, The Man I Love, Cheyenne, Uncertain Glory, Objective, Burma!, Manpower, Desperate Journey, Northern Pursuit, The Strawberry Blonde, They Died with Their Boots On, Gentleman Jim, Dark Command, and They Drive by Night.
Vincent Sherman: Nora Prentiss, Mr. Skeffington, Adventures of Don Juan, The Unfaithful, The Hard Way, Old Acquaintance, The Hasty Heart, In our Time, Pillow to Post, Janie Gets Married, Saturday's Children, The Man Who Talked Too Much, Underground, Flight from Destiny, Across the Pacific, and All Through the Night.
Anatole Litvak: The Snake Pit, City for Conquest, The Battle of Russia, Why We Fight, Sorry, Wrong Number, This Above All, The Long Night, All This, and Heaven Too, and Castle on the Hudson.
Max Ophüls: Caught, The Reckless Moment, The Exile, Letter from an Unknown Woman, Vendetta, and Sarajevo.
Charles Vidor: Gilda, Cover Girl, Over 21, The Loves of Carmen, The Tuttles of Tahiti, The Desperadoes, Together Again, A Song to Remember, The Man from Colorado, New York Town, Ladies in Retirement, My Son, My Son!, and The Lady in Question.
Edgar G. Ulmer: Detour, Isle of Forgotten Sins, Girls in Chains, Tomorrow We Live, Club Havana, The Strange Woman, My Son, the Hero, Jive Junction, Strange Illusion, Bluebeard, Her Sister's Secret, The Pirates of Capri, Ruthless, The Wife of Monte Cristo, and Carnegie Hall.
Victor Fleming: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Joan of Arc, Adventure, A Guy Named Joe, and Tortilla Flat.
Joseph L. Mankiewicz: A Letter to Three Wives, Escape, House of Strangers, The Late George Apley, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, Dragonwyck, and Somewhere in the Night.
Robert Bresson: Angels of Sin and Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne.
Luis Buñuel: Gran Casino and The Great Madcap.
Fei Mu: Spring in a Small Town, Confucius, The Beauty, A Wedding in the Dream, The Magnificent Country, Songs of Ancient China, and The Little Cowheard.
Kenji Mizoguchi: The 47 Ronin, A Woman of Osaka, Flame of My Love, The Love of the Actress Sumako, Victory Song, Utamaro and His Five Women, Women of the Night, Victory of Women, The Famous Sword Bijomaru, Three Generations of Danjuro, The Life of an Actor, and Miyamoto Musashi.
Douglas Sirk: Lured, Sleep, My Love, Hitler's Madman, Summer Storm, A Scandal in Paris, Shockproof, and Slightly French.
René Clément: The Battle of the Rails, The Damned, Mr. Orchid, and The Walls of Malapaga.
Robert Hamer: Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Spider and the Fly, It Always Rains on Sunday, San Demetrio London, and Pink String and Sealing Wax.
Robert Siodmak: Criss Cross, Cry of The City, Dark Mirror, Phantom Lady, The Killers, The Spiral Staircase, Christmas Holiday, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, Time Out of Mind, Son of Dracula, The Suspect, The Night Before the Divorce, Someone to Remember, Cobra Woman, The File on Thelma Jordon, The Great Sinner, West Point Widow, My Heart Belongs to Daddy, and Fly-by-Night.
Humphrey Jennings: Spring Offensive, Welfare of the Workers, London Can Take It!, A Diary for Timothy, This Is England, Words for Battle, Fires Were Started, Listen to Britain, The Silent Village, The True Story of Lili Marlene, The Eighty Days, Myra Hess, A Defeated People, The Cumberland Story, and The Dim Little Island.
William Dieterle: Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet, Kismet, This Love of Ours, Syncopation, The Searching Wind, Rope of Sand, Portrait of Jennie, The Accused, I'll Be Seeing You, A Dispatch from Reuters, The Devil and Daniel Webster, Tennessee Johnson, and Love Letters.
Edmund Goulding: The Razor's Edge, Nightmare Alley, The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, Everybody Does It, Claudia, Of Human Bondage, Flight from Folly, Forever and a Day, Old Acquaintance, The Constant Nymph, The Great Lie, and Til We Meet Again.
Luchino Visconti: Ossessione and La Terra Trema.
Ernest B. Schoedsack: Dr. Cyclops and Mighty Joe Young.
Roy Del Ruth: It Happened on 5th Avenue, Red Light, The Babe Ruth Story, The Chocolate Soldier, Topper Returns, He Married His Wife, Du Barry Was a Lady, and Ziegfeld Follies.
Rene Clair: And Then There Were None, I Married a Witch, Man About Town,It Happened Tomorrow, The Flame of New Orleans, and Forever and a Day.
John Cromwell: Victory, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, So Ends Our Night, Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake, Anna and the King of Siam, Dead Reckoning, The Enchanted Cottage, Since You Went Away, and Night Song.
Richard Fleischer: Trapped, Make Mine Laughs, The Clay Pigeon, Follow Me Quietly, Banjo, Design for Death, So This Is New York, Bodyguard, and Child of Divorce.
Norman Z. McLeod: Jackass Mail, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Panama Hattie, The Paleface, and Little Men.
submitted by Britneyfan456 to classicfilms [link] [comments]

I made a compilation of (almost all) GBF.wiki's April Fools Art Swap references.

Credits to Lumos96 for the some of the screencaps here.
(Please do note that the Expected column are just solely my opinions. If you have any other expectations for the April Fools Art swap of these characters, you might want to share with us here.)
Characters:
Name April Fool "Base Art" Expected
GBF Wiki's Vyrn Ball Vyrn Ball, but it's Red Sphere.
Main Character (untouched, really?)
Albert Albert in his Dragalia Lost rendition.
Aletheia Gandalf (Sir Ian McKellen), Lord of the Rings series
Alexiel Drawn Haruhi Suzumiya in Alexiel outfit (VA Joke: Aya Hirano)
Altair Altair (Assassin's Creed)
Andira Generic cartoon monkey
Anila Generic cartoon sheep Shawn the Sheep? Hibiki Tachibana? Okita Souji (F/GO)? Any freaking Aoi Yuuki role?
Anre A stock image of a potato replaced his body aside from her mustache, and his spear. Pringles
Anzu Futaba A stillshot of Anzu from the [email protected] anime, with a screenshot of a tumblr post.
Aoidos Crow (Show By Rock!!) (VA Joke: Kishow Taniyama)
Arthur (Event)) Arthur Read Arthur Pendragon) (Fate/Prototype)?
Athena Athena (Saint Seiya) Athena Asamiya (KoF)?
Ayer A stillshot from Fight Club?
Azazel Azazel being runned over by Bacchus' carriage in Shingeki no Bahamut: Genesis anime. Fun fact: It's actually his low HP animation in-game.
Baal Demonic Baal (any depictions or illustrations from history, books, or other media)
Bakura (Yami) Bakura (Yu-Gi-Oh!)
Beatrix Beatrix (Platinum Sky) on an end subtitle from the last episode of Cowboy Bebop. Umineko Beatrice? Divine Comedy Beatrice?
Black Knight A black knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Fire Emblem Path of Radiance Black Knight/Zelgius?
Blazing Teacher Elmott Eikichi Onizuka (Great Teacher Onizuka)
Cagliostro 2019: Alessandro Cagliostro, 2020: Cagliostro (Symphogear)
Cagliostro (Dark)) Cagliostro (Transformed) (Symphogear)
Cagliostro (Summer)) More Symphogear Cagliostro
Caim Caim (Drakengard (PS2))
Cain (Grand)) CnC: Red Alert Kane (Joseph Kucan) Kain Highwind? Biblical Cain?
Cassius (Event)) Image manipulated (Society event spoilers!) Cassius with his head opened up in the fashion of a bottle cap.
Cassius (Summer)) Twitter post screencap.
Catherine (SR)) 2019: Katherine from Catherine. This too was removed from the wiki.
Cerberus Her render from Dragalia Lost, like Lily and Albert?
Ceylan and Clarisse
Charlotta Stock image of potatoes on a box Saber from Fate/stay night?
Charlotta (Light)) Stock image of a lightbulb on a potato. Specifically, a potato battery. Saber from Fate/stay night doing her Noble Phantasm?
Chat Noir 2019: Cat Noir (Miraculous: Tales Of Ladybug & Cat Noir,) although they removed it. Joker, but not in his GBF rendition? Lupin III? Any gentleman thief?
Chloe Kuro/Chloe von Einzbern
Chloe (Summer) Kuro/Chloe von Einzbern in a swimsuit.
Christina 2019: The poker game. 2020: Chris Yukine (Transformed) (Symphogear XV)
Clarisse Drawn rendition of Clarisse with Djeeta and Cagliostro on an explosion in the fashion of "Disaster Girl" meme.
Clarisse (Holiday)) Drawn rendition of Clarisse with Djeeta and Cagliostro on an exploded Christmas tree in the fashion of "Disaster Girl" meme.
Clarisse (Light)) Drawn rendition of Clarisse with Djeeta and Cagliostro on an explosion with flare effects in the fashion of "Disaster Girl" meme.
Clarisse (Valentine)) Drawn rendition of Clarisse with Djeeta and Cagliostro on an explosion with Valentine Chocolates as debris in the fashion of "Disaster Girl" meme.
Colossus Colossus (Marvel Comics) The Colossal Titan? The Colossi from Shadow of the Colossus game?
Cucouroux (SSR) "kokoro" (JP: heart) jokes
Cure Black and Cure White Their character design from their home series.
Dante Dante (Devil May Cry 1 render)
Dante (SR)) Dante (Devil Mary Cry 4 render)
Dante and Freiheit 2019: Some man carrying with a guitar case, featuring Freiheit from granbleu fantasy series. 2020: Dante (Unlockable Super Dante outfit) (Devil May Cry 4) with Freiheit. "Boomer Dante" as his uncap art.
Deliford Delibird (Pokémon)
Deliford (SR)) Delibird (Pokémon) in HD
Dorothy Aqua (Seiyuu Joke)
Drang (Grand)) "What are you gonna do, stab me?" image. Trivia: It was deleted last year, but it came back this year. Gintoki Sakata (VA joke: Tomokazu Sugita)
Drusilla A screenshot of emptied rupies (A reference to her Rupie-spending skillset.)
Eahta Kyoshiro Senyro (Samurai Shodown series)
Ejaeli Kirby with Mike ability (Kirby series)
Elmott "Elmo Rise" meme
Estarriola Kirby with Sleep ability (Kirby series)
Eugen Prinz Eugen (the real ship or its shipfu (Kancolle, Azur Lane) equivalent.)
Eugen (Grand)) Edited brown-hued Mr. Krabs (Spongebob Squarepants) with a eyepatch, and a shotgun. Prinz Eugen (the real ship or its shipfu (Kancolle, Azur Lane) equivalent.)
Europa Europa (moon)/Jupiter II, one of the moons of planet Jupiter. Europa (Fate/Grand Order)?
Eustace Eustace (Courage the Cowardly Dog)
Farrah (Summer)) Farrah Fawcett
Feather All kinds of "feather" in the game as a pun. From top to center, clockwise: Falcon Feather, Mystical Feather, Gleaming Feather, Zephyr Feather, Fortuitous Feather, Satin Feather, and Azure Feather. Missing are the Primarch Pinions, which they're also feathers.
Feather (SR)) Rock Howard (Fatal Fury and King of Fighters series)
Feather (Halloween)) An illustration of a black feather.
Feower Anpanman
Ferry A ferry boat, or her pits.
Ferry (Grand) A ferry boat, or her pits.
Ferry (Halloween) A ferry boat, or her pits.
Ferry (SSR) A ferry boat, or her pits.
Ferry and Tyre
Fif Kirby with Mirror ability (Kirby series) Doraemon (VA joke)
Forte Forte (Megaman series)
Fraux Yukiho Hagiwara (Punishing Fallen Angel) ([email protected] Starlight Stage: Cinderella Girls) (VA joke: Azumi Asakura)
Freezie Frieza (Dragon Ball Z series) (a "freezing" pun) A freezer.
Friday (Summer)) A stillshot from Rebecca Black's "Friday" music video (probably a thumbnail on Youtube.)
Gachapin The Holiday/New YeaAnniversary Roulette
Galadar The illustration of Pokemon Sword and Shield's Galar region.
Garma His original art with "Level 1 Crook" on top of it, referencing the infamous Mafia City ads (see Yuisis.)
Gawain Char Aznable with MS-06S Char's Zaku II (Mobile Suit Gundam), but somehow the wiki removed it. F/GO Gawain? F/GO Riyo Gawain?
Geisenborger An image of a hamburger (YUM.)
Ghandagoza Akuma (Street Fighter series, but on his Tekken 7 incarnation) after using the Raging Demon Rage Art (referencing Ghandagoza's FLB uncap art.)
Goblin Mage Goblin Mage (Final Fantasy IX)
Grimnir PriConne art of Kokkoro
Grimnir (Valentine)) PriConne art of Kokkoro (New Year)
Haaselia Kaguya (Dynamis Series summon) (moon puns.) The Moon from Soul Eater? The (damaged) Moon from Assassination Classroom? The (shattered) Moon from RWBY? Or that moon from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time?
Haohmaru Hyakkimaru from Dororo
Helel ben Shalem Maggie Simpson (The Simpsons) Koenma (Yu Yu Hakusho)
Io Eeyore (Winnie the Pooh) (pronunciation joke)
Io (Grand)) Nanoha Takamachi (Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha) (VA joke: Yukari Tamura)
Ippatsu This image with Ippatsu's face edited over the man's face.
Izmir Elsa (Frozen)
Jeanne d'Arc Jeanne d'Arc/Ruler from Fate/Apocrypha (Fate/Grand Order, initial art)
Jeanne d'Arc (Dark)) Jeanne d'Arc (Alter) (Fate/Grand Order)
Jeanne d'Arc (Grand)) Jeanne d'Arc/Ruler from Fate/Apocrypha (Fate/Grand Order, 4th Ascension art)
Jeanne d'Arc (SR)) Jeanne d'Arc (Santa Lily Alter) (Fate/Grand Order)
Jeanne d'Arc (Themed)) A screencap of Granblue Fantasy's maintenance page (only works when there's really a maintenance going on.) (referencing her banner started with the servers crashing.) Fate/Grand Order's version of Summer Jeanne).
Johann An image of Johann Strauss, himself or his son.
Joker 2019: Joker (Batman the Animated Series) 2020: still Joker (Batman: the Animated Series, but he's holding a card with his face on it.)
Karteira Tressa Colzione (Octopath Traveler) Francesca (Dragalia Lost)
Katalina (Grand)) Murgleis (her recuitment weapon) Herself rubbing Vyrn??
Kokkoro Rage of Bahamut art of Grimnir (Grimnir Returns)
Kolulu A photo of Yuuki Ono, Gran and Lancelot's voice actor, the Gislalord.
Korwa A Polish "kurwa" joke i.e. Stachu Jones?
Krugne Ryuji Otogi (Yu-Gi-Oh!)
Kumbhira Generic clip art of a boar on a bamboo.
La Coiffe Edward Scissorhands (Johnny Depp)
Lady Katapillar and Vira Vaporeon, Caterpie (Pokémon)
Laguna Laguna Loire (FFVIII), or the Laguna de Bay or the eponymous province in the Philippines.
Lamretta Any liquors? Johnny Walker? Absolut?
Lamretta (R) Any liquors? Johnny Walker? Absolut?
Lamretta (Water) Any liquors? Johnny Walker? Absolut?
Lancelot Lancelot (Saber) (Fate/Grand Order, 4th Ascension art) Lancelot (Berserker) (Fate/Grand Order?) Lancelot from Mike, Lu & Og?
Lecia Lecia's expression with 3 stars on her background (probably a joke as she's the only main story SR character (not counting Rein) without an FLB uncap.)
Leonora Kunoichi (Samurai Warriors)
Levi Leviathan (the Bible,) or the Leviathan/Leviathan Omega in-game?
Levin Sisters Top to bottom: Madoka Kaname (Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica,) Shuten-douji (Fate/Grand Order,) Hibiki Tachibana (Symphogear series.) (VA joke: Aoi Yuuki)
Lilele Ranka Lee (Macross Frontier)
Lily Lily in her Dragalia Lost rendition.
Lily (Event)) Clay Golem with an SR crystal above it.
Lobelia Cioccolata w/ his Stand, Green Day (JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Vento Aureo)
Lucio Lucifer (Shin Megami Tensei series) with 3 image stock katanas and a pair of small wings edited behind him.
Lucius Dio Brando (JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood, episode 1) (VA joke: Takehito Koyasu)
Lucius (Fire)) Dio Brando (JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood, episode 3) (VA joke: Takehito Koyasu)
Lucius (SSR)) DIO w/ ZA WARUDO (JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders) (VA joke: Takehito Koyasu)
Ludmila A mushroom poster named "Poisonous & Psychotropic Mushrooms", originally created by David Arora, a renowned mycologist.
Luna Kaguya Luna (a virtual Youtuber)
Lunalu (SSR)) Lunalu's event portait with a bunch of skill icons on her paper. Said skill icon is "Ground Zero," Sarasa/Threo's notable skill, in which it is notoriously used with Lunalu's Facsimile skill.
Mahira Generic clip art of a chicken with Mahira's string edited on it.
Maria Theresa Maria Theresa Amalia Walburga von Österreich, the ruler of Habsburg dominions, the Duchess of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany and Holy Roman Empress.
Mariah Mariah Carey
Marquiares Megumin (KonoSuba) with an pair of angled shades edited in.
Medusa An edited image of a jellyfish with Medusa's eyes, and blushes. F/SN RideMedusa
Medusa (Promo)) Original art of Medusa with LogicLinks logo over it (refers to her required method of recruiting her.)
Melissabelle An MSPaint rendition of a corn.
Melissabelle (Valentine)) An MSPaint rendition of a corn, with a pink heart.
Mirin Kikkoman Aji-Mirin.
Monika FE Three Houses' Bernadetta (VA joke: Ayumi Tsuji), or Doki Doki Literature Club Monika.
Monika (Grand) FE Three Houses' Bernadetta (VA joke: Ayumi Tsuji), or Doki Doki Literature Club Monika.
Mugen A screenshot of a M.U.G.E.N. gameplay. Characters are "Oira GF" by yugusic, and the stage is the "The Grancypher" from Panda Hoodie Grl & friends.
Narmaya Original art with Mao Ichimichi (M・A・O)'s head edited over Narmaya's head.
Narmaya (Holiday)) Original art with Mao Ichimichi (M・A・O)'s head edited over Narmaya's head.
Narmaya (Summer)) Original art with Mao Ichimichi (M・A・O)'s head edited over Narmaya's head.
Narmaya (Valentine)) Original art with Mao Ichimichi (M・A・O)'s head edited over Narmaya's head.
Nemone Original art, repeated all over the place (probably a reference to her catchphrase.)
Nezahualpilli A clip art of a "birdman" holding a spear.
Nicholas Genji (Overwatch)
Nier NieR (Gestalt) US PS3 box art Sakura Matou, or NieR Automata-related crap
Nina Drango "Blush Value" of characters in the wiki superimposed over each other.
Niyon Hiding in a cardbox in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Probably a reference to her appearance in Grand Blues. Notte (Dragalia Lost)
Orchid 2019: A stock image of an orchid flower. 2020: Carl Clover and Deus Machina: Nirvana (Blazblue)
Owen Owen's character design in Shingeki no Bahamut: Manaria Friends.
Paris (Event)) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.
Pavidus A screencap of Willie McNabb's tweet.
Pecorine Original art with Mao Ichimichi (M・A・O)'s head edited over Pecorine's head.
Pengy Pingu
Percival Percy the Small Engine (Thomas and Friends)
Petra (SSR) JoJo Stand jokes.
Philosophia Anything regarding Philosophy.
Philosophia (SR) Anything regarding Philosophy.
Predator The Predator) from Alien vs. Predator
Rackam Various panels from Grand Blues of Rackam doing stupid things, and exploding.
Rackam (Grand) Laguna Loire (FFVIII)/Balthier (FFXII) (VA joke: Hiroaki Hirata)
Randall (SR) Sanji from One Piece, Hwoarang from Tekken series?
Rei Rei Ayanami (Neon Genesis Evangelion) (name joke) Anyone with bizarre things in their eyes (i.e. Ciel Phantomhive, Lelouch, Sharingan users, FREAKING SHIKI RYOUGI?)
Reinhardtzar (Grand) (don't bother, it's empty.)
Richard The Jewel Resort Casino Poker game
Richard (SR) The Jewel Resort Casino Poker game
Romeo (Event) Ramza Beoulve (Final Fantasy Tactics), or any similar designs from Akihiko Yoshida.
Rosamia Any of Yui Ishikawa's roles (2B, Enterprise, Mikasa, Violet Evergarden?)
Rosamia (SR) Any of Yui Ishikawa's roles (2B, Enterprise, Mikasa, Violet Evergarden?)
Rosamia (SSR) (She was once had a April Fool quirk, the Colony Laser from Mobile Suit Gundam, but somehow they removed it.) Any of Yui Ishikawa's roles (2B, Enterprise, Mikasa, Violet Evergarden?)
Rosetta (Grand) Kiara Sesshouin? (VA joke)
Sakura Shinguji The commercial with her VA, and Segata Sanshiro.
Sandalphon (Event)) An iPhone 5, with a phone case that looks like a Japanese slipper. It's a visual pun.
Sarunan (Dark)) Sarunan (Dark) in a jar of honey.
Scathacha Scathach (Fate/Grand Order) alternative: Scathach (Shin Megami Tensei)
Scathacha (Valentine) Scathach-Skadi (Fate/Grand Order)
Seofon His Eternal's Summer Vacation outfit, but focused on his abs and crotch.
Seox A Scooby-Doo parody of unmasking Seox, with Gran as Fred and him as a villain in a ghost costume.
Shao The Medicine Seller from Mononoke (no, not the Ghibli one.) (VA joke: Takahiro Sakurai)
Shiva 2019: A title screen of a game based on an Indian Nickolodeon show. 2020: Shiva (Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward)
Siegfried Saber of Black (Siegfried) from Fate/Apocrypha (Fate/Grand Order, 4th Ascension art)
Siegfried (Fire) Sieg from Fate/Apocrypha
Societte (Fire) A stock image of an helicopter.
Sophia Sophia, the Goddess (Warring Triad)) (Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward)
Spinnah 2019: A stock image of a fidget spinner, but somehow they deleted it.
Stan An album cover of "#" by the K-pop girlgroup LOONA. The term "stan" is used within the general pop fandom that means "stalker fan." It is mostly used within the K-Pop fandom.
Sturm (Grand)) Strum (Advance Wars (GBA))
Suzaku Kururugi I can't find them, there's only soup. I mean I'm at soup! I'M AT THE SOUP STORE!!!
Tanya Tanya Degurechaff (Saga of Tanya the Evil) (name joke)
Therese (Event)) Yugi Muto "dueling" (Yu-Gi-Oh!)
Threo 2019: Soul Balm > A stock image of a two-layered cake.
Tiamat Tiamat (Dungeons and Dragons) Beast II (Fate/Grand Order)
Tien Tien Shinhan (Dragon Ball) Something TH-related.
Tsubasa Tsubasa Kazanari (Symphogear XD Unlimited)
Tweyen A kitchen twine (probably a pronunciation pun)
Tyre There's no other reference like Gaston! (Beauty and the Beast, 1991 animated movie)
Uzuki Shimamura Z35 (Azur Lane) (Design and VA joke)
Vajra Generic clip art of a dog with a red scarf, while there's a similar looking fish down there.
Vane A wind vane.
Vania A red apple core (Vampy is core + (potential) The Twilight Saga) reference?)
Viceroy An Iron Cluster. (why?)
Vikala A cartoon illustration of a rat with balloons.
Vira Eevee (Pokémon)
Vira (Grand)) Sylveon (Pokémon) with Luminiera/Chevalier Bits
Vira (Promo)) Flareon (Pokémon)
Vira (SSR)) Umbreon (Pokémon)
Vira (Summer)) Leafeon (Pokémon)
Vira (Wind)) Jolteon (Pokémon)
Volenna (Event)) Lightning (Knight of Etro outfit) (Final Fantasy XIII-2)
Walder (Holiday)) Generic clip art of a man's head with a Christmas tree and Santa's hat at the top.
Wulf and Renie 2019: A stock clip-art of Red Riding Hood and a wolf. 2020: Akazukin (Otogi Jushi Akazukin)
Yggdrasil Suzuho Ueda ([email protected] Cinderella Girls: Starlight Stage, Smiling Tree+ art)
Yngwie Blastoise (Pokémon) Yngwie Malmsteen
Yodarha (SSR)) An illustration of Yoda (Star Wars) (nickname joke)
Yuisis Her original art with the phrase "Level 100 Boss" over it. Probably a reference to the infamous Mafia City ads (see Garma.)
Yuisis (Fire) 2B (Nier Automata)
Yurius Marluxia (Kingdom Hearts)
Zahlhamelina A stock image of a potato replaced her body aside from her hands, her staff, and the flames.
Zeta A photo of Kana Hanazawa.
Zooey Original art with a screenshot of a tumblr post over it.
Zooey (Promo)) Original art of Zooey with GBF-themed SMBC Visa credit cards on both hands (refers to her required method of recruiting her.)
If something's missing here (especially when they add more April Fools crap on the wiki while I make this,) or any mistakes here, leave a comment.
submitted by Kalafino to Granblue_en [link] [comments]

Covid Shutdowns (updated regularly)

Many restaurants, theaters, bars etc are closing or offering limited services because of the COVID-19 pandemic. I would like to assemblea list of what is closed or offering limited services for people’s reference.
Please tell me if you see something that should be added to the list.
all restaurants/bars etc in Santa Fe are limited to 50% capacity with the White House suggesting people avoid gatherings of 10 or more nationwide.
LAST UPDATED: 8pm 3/18/2020
Key for symbols: 🔴: Closed completely 🟡: Partially open 🔵: Mostly open except for large events
Churches * 🔴 Archdiocese of Santa Fe (all Catholic Churches and Schools): closed until further notice * 🟡 The Church of the Holy Faith: All meetings cancelled, but worship services continue. * First Presbyterian Church: All services suspended until further notice. * 🟡 St. Bede's Episcopal Church: all special events, Sunday Schools, singing and book clubs and other non worship activities have been suspended until further notice. * 🔴 St. John's United Methodist Church: Sunday worship and Sunday School suspended through March 29th * 🔴 Unitarian Universalist Santa Fe: Closed for public gatherings through the end of March * 🔴 Upaya Zen Center: the March 18th Dharma will be live streamed on Upaya's youtube channel with no audience in the zendo. All other public events cancelled until further notice.
Concerts & Other Entertainment * 🟡 Alas de Agua Art Collective: Moving their workshops to an online format * 🔴 AMP Concerts: All events suspended through March, possibly longer * 🔴 Concerts @ The Kitchen Sink: all scheduled concerts are cancelled, some may be rescheduled. * 🔴 Georgia O'Keefe Museum & Ghost Ranch Abiquiu: Closed until further notice * 🔴 Gathering of Nations Powwow: Postponed until further notice * 🔴 Ghost. All shows until April cancelled, will attempt to reschedule if possible * 🟡 Holdmyticket.com: is working to see if events can be rescheduled, ticket holders and buyers should email [email protected] to check the status of events. * 🔴 IAIA Museum of Contemporary Arts: closed until at least April 6th with all public programming canceled. * 🔴 Monday Night Swing: cancelled until further notice * 🔴 Ohkay Owingeh Casino: Closed through April 1st * 🔴 Poeh Cultural Center: All current programming including the Pojoaque Farmer's Market, Butterfly Market and Native Artists Showcase are postponed. The Museum is closed until further notice. * 🟡 Pueblo of Pojoaque: All 3 Casinos (Buffalo Thunder, Cities of Gold and Jake's Casino) closed until March 30th. The three Pojoaque Casinos will remain open. * 🔴 Rockin' Rollers skating rink: Closed until April * 🔴 ** Santa Fe Art Institute: All upcoming large events have been canceled. * 🔴 **Santa Fe Children's Museum: closed until further notice * 🔴 Santa fe Improv: All classes suspended through March 28th * 🔴 Santa fe Pro Musica: all remaining concerts for the season have been canceled or postponed. * 🔴 SITE Santa Fe: closed until further notice * 🔴 Ski Santa Fe: Closed for the rest of the season. * 🔴 Teatro Paraguas: All events in March have been cancelled. * 🔴 Tesuque Casino: Closed until further notice * 🔴 The Wheelright Museum of the American Indian: All events postponed through April, new events will be posted online as they become available.
Government Services * 🔴 Senior meal services: Closed until further services, to arrange for meals through Meals on Wheels call 505-955-4700 * 🔴 Senior Centers: Closed until further notice * 🔴 Jails: All visitations are discontinued and inmates are being screened for all infectious disease. * 🔴 City-Sponsored Community events and camps: cancelled until further notice (including GCCC and Monica Royal center, City after school programs, easter egg hunt, all tournaments etc * 🔴 Community/Recreation Centers & City Libraries: closed through at least April 5th, All classes & activities cancelled. * 🔵 City Meetings: all meetings suspended through Apr 5th except for the Governing Body, Finance Committee, Public Works and Public Utilities meetings, which may be held via teleconferences. * 🔴 New Mexico RailRunner Express: all train services suspended through April 3rd. Rio Metro buses still operational. * 🔴 New Mexico State Parks: All parks closed through April 9th
Restaurants * 🟡 Backroad Pizza: Closed except for contact-free curbside pickup * 🟡 Chipotle: dining room is closed, still open for takeout/pickup/delivery * 🟡 Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeeshop: In store closed, accepting pickup orders * 🟡 Cowgirl Restauranc: Closed to dine in customers through April 6th, but working with Fetch and Dashing Delivery . concerts canceled through April 15th * 🔵 El Farol: Late Night live music cancelled, Flamenco Dinner Show and early evening performances still running * 🟡 Jambo Café: closed except for delivery via Dashing Delivery. Jambo Imports Closed until further notice. * 🟡 Kohnami: Closed except to contact free pickup * 🔴 La Reina at El Rey ** Bar is closed until further notice * 🔴 **Lamy Junction: Closed until the state of emergency is lifted** * 🔵 Mine Shaft Tavern: Live music cancelled until Apr 9th * 🔵 Second Street Brewery: All music cancelled through April at all locations * 🔴 Ten Thousand Waves & Izanami Restaurant: Closed through Apr 15th * 🔵 Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery: Concerts suspended until the Health Departments lifts the ban on mass gatherings * 🟡 Wayward Wednesdays @ Chili Line Brewery: Weekly comedy show and open mic canceled until further notice, takeout now available. * 🟡 McDonalds: Dining rooms closed, only pickup, takeout and delivery allowed. * 🔴 Museum Hill Café: Closed until April * 🔴 Plaza Café Southside: Closed until further notice
Stores & Other Businesses * 🟡 Candyman Strings & Things: The store interior will be closed to customers until further notice, but free delivery is available within and outside of Santa Fe as well as parking lot pickup. Video conferencing lessons will be offered to current students at no extra cost, as well as in-person lessons at the Candyman Music Education Center. * 🔴 REI: All stores closed nationwide through March 27th * 🔴 YogaSource: all classes, workshops and events are cancelled through the end of March, at which time the studio will reassess.
Other * 🟡 La Tierra Toastmasters: closed, but will still hold online meetings via Zoom * 🔴 Lensic Performing Arts Center: all events cancelled or postponed through April 9th. * 🔴 Meow Wolf: closed until april * 🔴 Jean Cocteau Cinema: Closed until further notice with events canceled until April 6th at the earliest * 🔴 Regal Cinemas closed until further notice * 🔴 Violet Crown: closed until further notice * 🔴 CCA and The Screen: closed until further notice * 🔴 NDI New Mexico: All performances canceled through April 4th * 🔴 New Mexico Dept of Cultural Affairs: All state museums and cultural institutions closed until further notice * 🔴 RENESAN Institute: All weekly lectures through Apr 2nd cancelled as well as all classes and tours through Apr 9th * 🟡 Santa Fe Botanical Gardens: Gardens remain open, but most special events have been cancelled or postponed indefinitely.
submitted by windows2000pro to SantaFe [link] [comments]

[Mega Thread] Origen de palabras y frases argentinas

Estimados rediturros, en base al post del usuario que hoy descubrió la etimología de Michi (gato), vengo a hacerles entrega del thread que se merecen aquellas personas curiosas.
Seguramente faltan varias palabras pero dejo las que fui recolectando. ----
A CADA CHANCHO LE TOCA SU SAN MARTÍN.
Alude al 11 de noviembre, día de San Martín de Tours, patrono de Buenos Aires, que se celebra comiendo lechón. Significa que a todos les llega en algún momento la compensación por sus buenos o malos actos.
A SEGURO SE LO LLEVARON PRESO.
Viene de Jaén, España, donde los delincuentes eran recluídos en el Castillo de Segura de la Sierra. Originalmente se decía `a (la prisión de) Segura se lo llevaron preso`, que advertía de no robar, para no terminar en Segura. Hoy significa que nadie está libre de alguna contingencia.
AL TUN TÚN.
Con la expresión `al tun tún`, los paremiólogos no se ponen de acuerdo: para unos deviene de `ad vultum tuum`, que en latín vulgar significa `al bulto`, y para otros, es una voz creada para sugerir una acción ejecutada de golpe. De cualquier forma, hoy `al tun tun` indica algo hecho sin análisis ni discriminación.
ANANÁ.
Es una fruta nativa de América del Sur, deliciosa, decorativa y habitualmente asociada con los climas tropicales. El vocablo ananá proviene de nana, que en guaraní significa perfumado. Y fueron los colonizadores portugueses quienes adaptaron esta voz original guaraní para acercarla al modo en que hoy la usamos en la Argentina. Otra de sus nominaciones, piña, se debe a Cristóbal Colón, quien al verla por primera vez (en 1493, en la isla de Guadalupe) pensó erróneamente que había encontrado un tipo de piñón de pino.
ATORRANTES.
Lo de `atorrantes` viene de principios del siglo pasado, cuando colocaron unos grandes caños de desagüe en la costanera, frente a la actual Casa de Gobierno, en lo que hoy es Puerto Madero. Éstos tenían la leyenda `A. Torrant et Cie.` (nombre del fabricante francés) bien grande a lo largo de cada segmento de caño, y estuvieron casi más de un año hasta que, por fin, los enterraron. Mientras tanto `se fueron a vivir a los caños` cuanto vago, linyera y sujetos de avería rondaban por la zona y así surgió este dicho. Cuando la gente se refería a las personas que vivían en esos caños, los llamaban "A-Torran-tes". Más adelante se llamó así a toda persona vaga o de mal comportamiento.
BACÁN.
Aunque casi ya no se emplea, podemos escuchar esta palabra en muchísimos tangos de comienzos del siglo XX. “Mina que de puro esquillo con otro bacán se fue”, dice la letra de Ivette, compuesta por Pascual Contursi. “Hoy sos toda una bacana, la vida te ríe y canta”, reza Mano a mano, el clásico de Celedonio Flores. Del genovés baccan (jefe de familia o patrón), el término alude a una persona adinerada, elegante, amante del buen vivir y acompañó un fenómeno social: el surgimiento de la clase media y la figura del hombre capaz de darse ciertos lujos y exhibirlos.
BANCAR.
Con frases como “Yo te banco” o “No te banco más”, bancar es uno de los verbos que más usamos los argentinos para expresar si aguantamos, toleramos o apoyamos a algo o alguien. El origen del término es bastante discutido. Algunas opiniones señalan que alude al banco en el que nos sentamos, en el sentido de que este soporta nuestro cuerpo. Sin embargo, otros argumentan que se trata de una expresión popularizada gracias a los juegos de azar. Es que “bancame” era la súplica que hacían los apostadores a los responsables de la banca en los casinos.
BARDO.
Esta voz comenzó a utilizarse en la década del 80 y se propagó rápidamente, incluso con su verbo derivado: bardear. Se aplica para indicar la ocurrencia de problemas, líos, desorden o embrollos. Para algunos es una especie de “lunfardo del lunfardo” porque se trata de una simplificación del término balurdo, otra locución coloquial que tomamos del italiano (balordo: necio o tonto). Así que están avisados: la próxima vez que digan que algo “es un bardo”, sepan que del otro lado del océano pueden interpretar que se refieren simplemente a una tontería.
BERRETÍN.
Una obsesión, un capricho, una esperanza acariciada sin fundamento racional… eso es un berretín. De origen genovés, donde beretín alude a una especie de gorro o sombrero, la creatividad popular nombró así a los deseos intensos que llevamos en la cabeza. El tango supo recoger esta palabra. Por ejemplo, Niño bien arranca: “Niño bien, pretencioso y engrupido, que tenés el berretín de figurar”. Esta voz, hoy casi en desuso, también llegó al cine. En 1933 se rodó Los tres berretines, la segunda película argentina de cine sonoro que narraba tres pasiones porteñas: fútbol, tango y cine.
BOLÓ.
Sin lugar a dudas, boludo es una de las palabras que identifican a los argentinos y que más transformó su sentido a lo largo de las últimas décadas. De ser agresiva e insultante, se convirtió en una expresión inocente y típica empleada para llamar la atención del otro. En la provincia de Córdoba evolucionó de tal modo que terminó teniendo una sonoridad totalmente diferente: boló. Y la frase “¿Qué hacé’ boló?” podría ser perfectamente el saludo entre dos cordobeses que se tienen la más alta estima.
BOLUDO [Mención especial].
Convertida en un verdadero clásico argentino, boludo (y sus derivados, boludez, boludeo, boludear) fue mutando su significado a través del tiempo.
En el siglo XIX, los gauchos peleaban contra un ejército de lo que en aquella época era una nación desarrolla como la española.
Luchaban contra hombres disciplinados en las mejores academias militares provistos de armas de fuego, artillería, corazas, caballería y el mejor acero toledano, mientras que los criollos (montoneros), de calzoncillo cribado y botas de potro con los dedos al aire, sólo tenían para oponerles pelotas, piedras grandes con un surco por donde ataban un tiento, bolas (las boleadoras) y facones, que algunos amarraban a una caña tacuara y hacían una lanza precaria. Pocos tenían armas de fuego: algún trabuco naranjero o arma larga desactualizada.
Entonces, ¿cuál era la técnica para oponerse a semejante maquinaria bélica como la que traían los realistas? Los gauchos se formaban en tres filas: la primera era la de los "pelotudos", que portaban las pelotas de piedras grandes amarradas con un tiento. La segunda era la de los "lanceros", con facón y tacuara, y, la tercera, la integraban los "boludos" con sus boleadoras o bolas. Cuando los españoles cargaban con su caballería, los pelotudos, haciendo gala de una admirable valentía, los esperaban a pie firme y les pegaban a los caballos en el pecho. De esta forma, rodaban y desmontaban al jinete y provocaban la caída de los que venían atrás. Los lanceros aprovechaban esta circunstancia y pinchaban a los caídos.
En 1890, un diputado de la Nación aludió a lo que hoy llamaríamos "perejiles", diciendo que "no había que ser pelotudo", en referencia a que no había que ir al frente y hacerse matar. En la actualidad, resemantizada, funciona como muletilla e implica un tono amistoso, de confianza. El alcance del término es tan grande que, en el VI Congreso de la Lengua Española, realizado en 2013, el escritor argentino Juan Gelman la eligió como la palabra que mejor nos representa.
BONDI.
A fines del siglo XIX, los pasajes de tranvía en Brasil llevaban escrita la palabra bond (bono en inglés). Por eso, las clases populares comenzaron a referirse al tranvía como bonde (en portugués la “e” suena como nuestra “i”). A partir de entonces, el recorrido del vocablo fue directo: la trajeron los italianos que llegaban desde Brasil y, cuando el tranvía dejó de funcionar en Buenos Aires, se convirtió en sinónimo popular de colectivo.
CAMBALACHE.
Es el título del emblemático tango escrito por Enrique Santos Discépolo en 1935. Pero, ¿sabés qué significa exactamente esta palabra? Originalmente deriva del verbo cambiar y en nuestro país se utilizó para nombrar a las antiguas tiendas de compraventa de objetos usados. Este es el sentido que se le da en el tango cuando dice: “Igual que en la vidriera irrespetuosa de los cambalaches se ha mezclao la vida, y herida por un sable sin remache, vi llorar la Biblia junto al calefón”. Por eso, el significado se transformó en sinónimo de desorden o mezcla confusa de objetos.
CANA.
Existen diferentes versiones para explicar cómo surgió este vocablo que en lunfardo significa unívocamente policía. Una dice que proviene de la abreviatura de canario, que se empleaba en España para designar a los delatores. Aunque la historia más extendida lo ubica en el idioma francés, del término canne, y alude al bastón que portaban los agentes del orden. Como sea, cana pasó a nombrar a la policía y, más tarde, se empleó como sinónimo de cárcel (“ir en cana”). Hoy también se utiliza la expresión “mandar en cana” para decir, con picardía, que dejamos a alguien en evidencia.
CANCHA.
Apasionados por el deporte, los argentinos repetimos frases que ya forman parte de nuestra genética. “El domingo vamos a la cancha” es una de ellas. Como es sabido, cancha es el espacio que se destina a eventos deportivos y, en ocasiones, a algunos espectáculos artísticos. Pero lo que pocos conocen es que esta palabra proviene del quechua, lengua originaria en la que kancha significa lugar plano. La acepción que en la actualidad le damos a esta expresión llegó con la práctica de la lidia de toros y pronto se expandió a todos los deportes.
CANILLITA.
El origen de esta palabra es literalmente literario. La voz se toma de Canillita, una pieza teatral escrita por Florencio Sánchez en los primeros años del siglo XX. El protagonista es un muchacho de 15 años que trabaja en la calle vendiendo periódicos para mantener a su familia. Como sus piernas son muy flaquitas y lleva unos pantalones que le quedaron cortos por los que asoman sus canillas, lo llaman Canillita. Desde 1947, el 7 de noviembre se celebra el Día del Canillita en homenaje a la muerte del gran escritor uruguayo, autor de otra obra emblemática M’hijo el dotor.
CATRASCA.
Puede que, a menudo, muchos de los que utilizan esta palabra para referirse socarronamente a las personas torpes o propensas a los pequeños accidentes no tengan cabal idea de su significado literal. Sucede que esta expresión se establece como síntesis de la frase “Cagada tras cagada”. En la Argentina, se hizo popular en 1977 a partir de la película El gordo catástrofe, protagonizada por Jorge Porcel, quien personificaba un hombre que vivía de accidente en accidente y al que todos llamaban Catrasca.
CHABÓN.
Desde el tango El firulete, de Rodolfo Taboada, que dice “Vos dejá nomás que algún chabón chamuye al cuete y sacudile tu firulete…”, hasta After chabón, el último disco de la banda de rock Sumo, esta voz del lunfardo se instaló en la cultura argentina como sinónimo de muchacho, tipo o pibe. El término deriva de chavó (del idioma caló, usado por el pueblo gitano), que significa joven, muchachuelo. De allí provienen, también, algunas variantes como chavo y chaval, empleadas en diferentes países de habla hispana.
CHAMAMÉ.
La palabra chamamé proviene del guaraní chaá-maì-mé (“estoy bajo la lluvia” o “bajo la sombra estoy”). Según Antonio Sepp, musicólogo jesuita, los nativos se reunían bajo un enorme árbol y, en forma de ronda, hablaban y cantaban ordenadamente a lo largo de la noche; respetaban así la sabiduría de los años, sin negarles un lugar a los más jóvenes. Muchas veces terminaban danzando y desplazándose como en un rito de adoración o gratitud. Es en esos espacios de encuentro donde se cree que nació el chamamé, esa marca de identidad musical de la Mesopotamia.
CHAMIGO.
La oralidad reunió che y amigo en un solo término para dar origen a una tercera palabra: chamigo. En este caso, el vocablo che proviene del guaraní, y no del mapuche ni del valenciano, donde tiene otros significados. En guaraní, che es el pronombre posesivo mi, y por eso chamigo quiere decir mi amigo o amigo mío. Esta voz se emplea en Chaco, Corrientes, Misiones y Entre Ríos, provincias donde la cultura guaranítica tiene mayor peso. “El chamigo es algo más que lo común de un amigo, es esa mano que estrecha con impulso repentino”, canta el chamamecero Antonio Tarragó Ros.
CHANGO.
En el noroeste se usa la palabra chango, o su diminutivo changuito, como sinónimo de niño o muchacho. El término deriva de una voz quechua que significa pequeño. Una zamba dice “Cántale, chango, a mi tierra, con todita tu alma, con toda tu voz, con tu tonadita bien catamarqueña; cántale, changuito, lo mismo que yo”. Nieto, Farías Gómez y Spasiuk son solo tres de los Changos que ha dado el folklore argentino y que llevan este vocablo como apodo, indisolublemente unido a su apellido.
CHANTA.
Se trata de la abreviatura de la voz genovesa ciantapuffi, que significa planta clavos; es decir, persona que no paga sus deudas o que no hace bien su trabajo. Pero en nuestro país, cuando le decimos chanta a alguien, nos referimos a que no es confiable o creíble, que es irresponsable o no se compromete. Aunque también se asocia a la picardía si se emplea para nombrar a aquel que finge y presume cualidades positivas. En otras palabras, un chanta sería un charlatán, un chamuyero. En cambio, “tirarse a chanta” es abandonar las obligaciones o, como se dice en la actualidad, “hacer la plancha”.
CHAUCHA Y PALITO.
Se estima que esta frase nació en nuestro campo y se la usa para referirse a algo de poco beneficio económico o ínfimo valor. El palito alude al de la yerba que flota en el mate mal cebado: aquello que no sirve, que está pero molesta. En el caso de chaucha refuerza el sentido: para el gaucho, básicamente carnívoro, la chaucha era un vegetal sin importancia, barato, del que prefería prescindir. Además, en tiempos de la colonia, chaucha se denominaba una moneda de poco valor. Como decir “poco y nada”, pero referido unívocamente al valor monetario.
CHE.
Es una de las palabras que más nos identifica en el mundo. Casi como una seña personal. La usamos para llamar la atención del otro, para quejarnos o simplemente como interjección. La historia más difundida sostiene que es una voz mapuche que significa gente. Sin embargo, otra teoría señala que proviene de Valencia (España), donde le dan usos similares a los nuestros. Ernesto Guevara, ya que de Che hablamos, debe su apodo a la recurrencia con que empleaba la muletilla en su discurso coloquial.
CHORIPÁN.
A mediados del siglo XIX, los gauchos que habitaban las zonas rurales del Río de la Plata dieron origen a una de las minutas que más caracteriza los domingos de los argentinos: el choripán. El término, que es un acrónimo de chorizo y pan, nació en los tradicionales asados gauchescos cuando comer una achura entre dos trozos de pan empezó a ser costumbre. Hoy, a esta denominación que ya es un símbolo identitario de nuestro vocabulario, se le acoplaron dos sándwiches más: vaciopán y morcipán.
COLIFA.
Colifa es un término muy popular que empleamos para expresar, con cierta ternura, que alguien está loco, piantado o rayado. Aunque el sentido común nos lleva a pensar que proviene del término colifato, los estudiosos explican que coli deriva del vocablo italiano coló (que significa, justamente, chiflado). A su vez, colo es loco al vesre ()al revés en lunfardo). Entonces, colifato, y su apócope colifa, aparecen como transformaciones de ese término original que en el habla de la calle sumó sílabas con fines únicamente creativos.
CROTO.
La expresión `Croto` se remonta a la década del `20, cuando el entonces Ministro de Obras Públicas y Transporte, Crotto, implementó una especie de certificado de pobreza y cuyo portador podía viajar gratis en los tranvías y trenes. Hoy en día se denomina con este nombre a toda persona mal vestida que con su apariencia denota su estado de indigencia.
CUARTETO.
En cualquier lugar del mundo se denomina cuarteto a un conjunto de cuatro integrantes, pero para los argentinos se trata, además, de un género musical con influencias de la tarantela y el pasodoble. Este ritmo tropical, que comenzó a bailarse en las zonas rurales de la provincia de Córdoba durante la década del 40 y se popularizó en todo el país en los 90, es una creación cien por ciento argentina. Sus dos exponentes más emblemáticos, Carlos “La Mona” Jiménez y Rodrigo Bueno, convirtieron a este género en una alegre y festiva marca de identidad.
DEL AÑO DEL ÑAUPA.
Se trata de una expresión muy antigua y, decirlo así, puede parecer redundante. Porque ñaupa es una voz quechua que significa viejo o antiguo. En general, se emplea para aludir a un acontecimiento que data de tiempo atrás. La creencia popular considera que Ñaupa fue una persona que tuvo una existencia asombrosamente prolongada. Muy utilizado en la década del 30, suele asociarse al lunfardo, en especial cuando se dice que un tango es “del año del ñaupa”. Su equivalente en España es “del tiempo de Maricastaña”. La versión moderna sería "del año del orto"
DESPIPLUME.
Muchas veces, los medios de comunicación masiva logran instalar expresiones en el habla cotidiana gracias a memorables personajes de ficción y, también, a los guiones de algunas publicidades. Es el caso de despiplume, una voz que nació en la década del 70 en un spot de la famosa marca de coñac Tres plumas protagonizado por Susana Giménez. A través de un juego de palabras, la idea fue asociar el término despiole al producto. Sin dudas, lo lograron, pues si bien hoy la expresión casi no se usa, cualquiera sabe qué queremos decir cuando afirmamos que “esto es un despiplume”.
DULCE DE LECHE.
“Más argentino que el dulce de leche”, dice la expresión popular. Sin embargo, son varios los países que se atribuyen su creación. Nuestra versión cuenta que esta delicia nacional nace de una casualidad. En 1829, Juan Manuel de Rosas esperaba a Juan Lavalle, su enemigo político, en una estancia. La criada hervía leche con azúcar para cebar el mate y olvidó la preparación por largo tiempo en el fuego. Aún así, Rosas quiso probar la sustancia espesa y amarronada que se había formado en la olla. Para sorpresa de la criada, le encantó y decidió bautizarla dulce criollo.
EN PAMPA Y LA VÍA.
Quedarse sin un peso, agotar los recursos, tener que vender la casa… Cualquiera de estas circunstancias puede expresarse con el mismo dicho: “Me quedé en Pampa y la vía”. ¿Alguna vez escuchaste de dónde viene este dicho? Tiene una ubicación geográfica muy precisa porque la calle La Pampa se cruza con la vía del tren muy cerca del hipódromo de Buenos Aires. Cuenta la leyenda que los jugadores que apostaban a los caballos, cuando tenían un día de mala racha y lo perdían todo, se iban del barrio en un ómnibus que salía del cruce de Pampa y la vía.
FIACA.
La historia de esta palabra –que todos asociamos a la pereza y desgano– se origina en el habla de los almaceneros de barrio procedentes de Italia. En genovés, fiacún alude al cansancio provocado por la falta de alimentación adecuada. Y fueron estos comerciantes quienes diseminaron el término que, con el uso coloquial, se transformó en fiaca. Como habrá sido que se instaló, que una de las famosas Aguafuertes porteñas de Roberto Arlt se refiere al tema: “No hay porteño, desde la Boca a Núñez, y desde Núñez a Corrales, que no haya dicho alguna vez: ‘Hoy estoy con fiaca”.
GAMBETA.
Proviene de gamba, que en italiano significa pierna, y es un término que usamos en diferentes contextos. Por ejemplo, “hacer la gamba” es ayudar a otra persona. Claro que, si las cosas no salen bien, decimos que lo que hicimos fue “meter la gamba”. Puntualmente, gambeta refiere a un movimiento de danza que consiste en cruzar las piernas en el aire. Pero en el Río de la Plata funciona como metáfora de otro arte, el fútbol: porque en el campo de juego, gambeta es el movimiento que hace el jugador para evitar que el contrario le arrebate la pelota. Por eso, en el uso cotidiano, cuando sorteamos obstáculos decimos que gambeteamos.
GAUCHADA.
En nuestro lenguaje cotidiano, hacer una gauchada es ayudar a alguien sin esperar nada a cambio. La gauchada era una actitud típica de los gauchos, un gesto completo de solidaridad. Es que estos hombres cumplieron un rol clave en la guerra de la Independencia por su valentía, habilidad para cabalgar y gran conocimiento del territorio. Por el contrario, hacer una guachada es cometer una traición, aunque detrás de esta expresión haya un sentido más trágico que desleal. Y es que guacho refiere a la cría animal que perdió a su madre, y por extensión, a los niños huérfanos.
GIL.
A la hora de dirigirse a alguien en forma peyorativa, gil es una de las expresiones preferidas por los argentinos. Asociada a la ingenuidad o a la falta de experiencia, algunos sostienen que proviene de perejil, otra voz coloquial que en una de sus acepciones puede emplearse con un significado parecido, puesto que hasta hace unos años era una hortaliza tan barata que los verduleros directamente la regalaban. Sin embargo, gil proviene del caló, una antigua lengua gitana en la que gilí quiere decir inexperto.
GUACHO.
En el campo se denomina como guacho al ternero que queda huérfano.
GUARANGO.
Es lamentable, pero algunas palabras que usamos cotidianamente provienen de situaciones históricas de discriminación y exclusión. Es el caso de guarango, que si bien en la actualidad se emplea como sinónimo de grosero, maleducado o malhablado, fue instalada por los españoles de la conquista como referencia despectiva y racista hacia los nativos que hablaban en guaraní. Decirle guarango a la persona que emplea un vocabulario soez es ofensivo pero no por la adjetivación que pretende, sino porque su origen alude a una descalificación arbitraria.
GUASO.
La frecuencia con que se emplea el término guaso en Córdoba lo convierte en un cordobesismo. Pero ser guaso en esta provincia tiene por lo menos dos niveles. Cuando alude a un hombre: “El guaso estaba tomando algo en el bar”, la palabra solo sirve para definirlo como individuo masculino (en este caso, guaso funciona como sinónimo de tipo, chabón, etc.). Pero también se emplea para hacer referencia a alguien grosero o de poca educación: “No seai guaso vo’”. Y es tal la dinámica del vocablo que permite hiperbolizarlo, de manera que algo guaso pueda crecer hasta ser guasaso.
GUITA.
En lunfardo, el dinero tiene infinidad de sinónimos: mango, viyuya, morlaco, vento, mosca, tarasca. También existe un lenguaje propio para hablar de su valor: luca es mil, gamba es cien y palo es millón. Sin embargo, el origen del término guita es difícil de rastrear. Una de las versiones más difundidas sostiene que proviene del alemán, específicamente del germano antiguo, de la voz witta, usada para denominar algo fundamental sin lo cual no se puede vivir. A su vez, witta también proviene del latín vita que significa vida.
GURÍ.
¿Alguna vez te dijeron gurí o gurisa? Seguramente fue cuando todavía eras un chico. Porque el término proviene de la voz guaraní ngiri y significa muchacho, niño. Es una palabra que podemos escuchar en Corrientes, Misiones y Entre Ríos, y por supuesto también en la República Oriental del Uruguay. “¡Tu recuerdo ya no es una postal, Posadas! Ni tu yerbatal, ni tu tierra colorada. Con un sapukay siento que tu voz me llama porque tengo en mí, alma de gurí”, dice la letra del chamamé Alma de gurí.
HUMITA.
La humita es mucho más que un gusto de empanada. Pero son pocos los que saben que la palabra proviene de la voz quechua jumint’a, un alimento que preparaban los antiguos pueblos indígenas del continente (incas, mayas y aztecas). Hecho a base de choclo triturado, la preparación incorpora cebolla, tomate y ají molido, se sirve envuelto en las mismas hojas de la planta del maíz. Este delicioso y nutritivo plato es típico de Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, Perú y el norte argentino.
IRSE AL HUMO.
“Se me vino al humo” es una imagen cotidiana en el habla de los argentinos. El dicho alude al modo en que los indígenas convocaban a los malones y figura en el Martín Fierro, de José Hernández: “Su señal es un humito que se eleva muy arriba / De todas partes se vienen / a engrosar la comitiva”. Pero también la registra Lucio V. Mansilla en Una excursión a los indios Ranqueles: “El fuego y el humo traicionan al hombre de las pampas”, escribe dando a entender que una fogata mal apagada o la pólvora que quemaban los fusiles bastaban para que lanzas y boleadoras acudiesen a la humareda.
LABURAR.
Laburar surge naturalmente del verbo lavorare (trabajar en italiano), que a su vez deriva de labor en latín, cuyo significado es fatiga, esfuerzo. La connotación negativa se encuentra también en los orígenes del término en español ya que trabajar proviene del vocablo latín tripalium, traducido como tres palos: un instrumento de castigo físico que se usaba contra los esclavos. De modo que si bien el laburo dignifica y es salud; el origen de su locución nos remonta a situaciones que poco tienen que ver con esos significados.
MATE.
La propuesta es natural en cualquier parte: “¿Y si nos tomamos unos mates?”. Esta infusión, la más amada por los argentinos, toma su nombre, como muchas otras palabras, de la lengua quechua. Porque mati es la voz que empleaban los pueblos originarios para referirse a cualquier utensilio para beber. Y es que mate tiene la particularidad de aludir al contenido, pero también al continente. Un término que para los rioplatenses significa mucho más que una bebida. Porque la mateada es un ritual, un espacio de encuentro y celebración.
MORFAR.
Proviene de la palabra italiana morfa que significa boca. Con el tiempo y el uso, la expresión adquirió nuevos sentidos: padecer, sobrellevar, sufrir: “Me morfé cuatro horas de cola”. En el ámbito del deporte, especialmente en el terreno futbolístico, suele emplearse el giro “morfarse la pelota”, algo así como jugar solo sin pasar el balón a los otros jugadores. Pero tan instalado estaba el término en la década del 30, que el historietista Guillermo Divito creó un personaje para la revista Rico Tipo que se llamaba Pochita Morfoni, una señora a la que le gustaba mucho comer.
MOSCATO.
Quizás los más jóvenes asocian el término a la famosa canción de Memphis La Blusera, Moscato, pizza y fainá. Sin embargo, el tradicional vino dulce, llamado así porque está hecho con uva moscatel, perdura más allá del blues local y sigue siendo un clásico de los bodegones y pizzerías de todo el país. El hábito llegó con los inmigrantes italianos a fines del siglo XIX, pero la costumbre de servirlo cuando se come una buena porción de muzzarella es propia de nuestro país y comenzó a establecerse allá por 1930.
NO QUIERE MÁS LOLA.
Lola era el nombre de una galleta sin aditivos que a principios del siglo XX integraba la dieta de hospital. Por eso, cuando alguien moría, se decía: `Este no quiere más Lola`. Y, desde entonces, se aplica a quien no quiere seguir intentando lo imposible.
ÑANDÚ.
De norte a sur y hasta la provincia de Río Negro, el ñandú es una de las aves que más se destaca en los paisajes de la Argentina. Este fabuloso animal de gran porte, que puede llegar a medir hasta 1,80 m de altura, toma su nombre de la lengua guaraní, en la que ñandú significa araña. La explicación alude a las semejanzas entre los elementos de la naturaleza. Los pueblos originarios veían un notorio parecido entre el plumaje del avestruz americano -y las figuras que se forman en él- y los arácnidos que habitan las regiones subtropicales.
NI EN PEDO.
Para ser tajantes, a veces decimos que no haremos algo "Ni en pedo", "Ni mamado", o “Ni ebrios ni dormidos”. Algunos sostienen que la expresión nació cuando Manuel Belgrano encontró a un centinela borracho y dormido. Enseguida, habría establecido una norma por la que “ningún vigía podía estar ebrio o dormido en su puesto”. Otra versión dice que, tras el triunfo en Suipacha, alguien alcoholizado propuso un brindis “por el primer Rey y Emperador de América, Don Cornelio Saavedra”. Mariano Moreno se enteró y lo desterró diciendo que nadie “ni ebrio ni dormido debe tener expresiones contra la libertad de su país”.
NO QUIERE MÁS LOLA.
Cuando no queremos más complicaciones, nos cansamos de participar en algo, o necesitamos cesar alguna actividad, decimos: “No quiero más lola”. En la Buenos Aires de 1930 se fabricaban las galletitas Lola. Elaboradas con ingredientes saludables, eran indicadas en las dietas de los hospitales. En ese contexto, cuando un enfermo podía empezar a ingerir otro tipo de alimentos, se decía que “No quería más lola”. Otro uso, más oscuro: cuando fallecía un paciente internado, obviamente, dejaba de comer. De ahí el dicho popular: “Este no quiere más lola”.
PANDITO.
Los mendocinos emplean muchos términos propios que pueden escucharse en su territorio y también, debido a la cercanía, en Chile (y viceversa). Una de las voces más representativas de este intercambio lingüístico es guón, apócope del huevón chileno. Existen algunas otras, pero menos conocidas. Por ejemplo, pandito. ¿Pero qué significa? Proviene de pando y quiere decir llano o poco profundo. “Me quedo en lo pandito de la pileta” o “Donde topa lo pandito”, que alude a donde termina el llano y comienza la montaña.
PAPUSA.
El lunfardo, la creatividad de la calle y el tango se ocupan de piropear y resaltar la belleza de la mujer. Quizá, una de las palabras que mejor lo hace sea papusa, empleada para referirse a una chica bonita, atractiva o espléndida. Este término, que también funciona como sinónimo de papirusa, se puede encontrar en clásicos del tango rioplatense como El ciruja, de Alfredo Marino, o ¡Che, papusa, oí!, de Enrique Cadícamo, que inmortalizó los versos “Che papusa, oí los acordes melodiosos que modula el bandoneón”.
PATOVICA.
Llamamos patovicas a quienes se ocupan de la seguridad de los locales bailables. Pero esta expresión nació lejos de las discotecas y cerca de los corrales avícolas. Allá por 1900, Víctor Casterán fundó en Ingeniero Maschwitz un criadero de patos y lo llamó Viccas, como las primeras letras de su nombre y su apellido. Alimentados con leche y cereales, los patos Viccas eran fornidos y sin grasa. La semejanza entre estos animales y los musculosos de los gimnasios surgió enseguida. Que los hercúleos custodios de los boliches terminaran cargando con ese mote, fue cuestión de sentarse a esperar.
PIBE.
Los rioplatenses suelen utilizar la expresión pibe como sinónimo de niño o joven. Existen diferentes versiones sobre su origen. La más difundida señala que proviene del italiano, algunos creen que del lombardo pivello (aprendiz, novato) y otros que se tomó del vocablo genovés pive (muchacho de los mandados). Pero la explicación española aporta el toque de humor. La palabra pibe, del catalán pevet (pebete), denominaba una suerte de sahumerio que gracias a la ironía popular y la subversión del sentido pasó a nombrar a los adolescentes, propensos a los olores fuertes.
PIPÍ CUCÚ.
Este argentinismo se usa para decir que algo es espléndido o sofisticado. La divertida leyenda cuenta que se popularizó en la década del 70 cuando Carlos Monzón llegó a París para pelear con el francés Jean-Claude Bouttier. Antes del combate, el argentino recibió la llave de la ciudad y, al tomar el micrófono para agradecer el honor, se dispuso a repetir el discurso que había ensayado largamente. La carcajada de la platea se desató cuando Monzón, en lugar de decir “merci beaucoup” (muchas gracias en francés) tal como lo había practicado, expresó algo nervioso: “pipí cucú”.
PIRARSE.
Pirarse es piantarse. Es decir, “irse, tomarse el buque”. Y literalmente así nace este verbo. El piróscafo era un barco a vapor que, en los primeros años del siglo XX, constituía la forma más rápida de viajar de un continente al otro. Por eso, la expresión “tomarse el piro” empezó a usarse para decir que alguien se marchaba de un lugar de manera apresurada. Sin embargo, el tiempo le otorgó otro significado: el que se iba, podía hacerlo alejándose de la realidad: “Está pirado”, “No le digas así que se pira”. Entonces, pirarse pasó a ser sinónimo de enloquecer.
PONCHO.
El poncho es una prenda sudamericana típica por definición que forma parte de la tradición criolla. Por simpleza, comodidad y capacidad de abrigo, es utilizado hasta el día de hoy en la Argentina, Chile, Ecuador y Bolivia. El origen de la palabra que lo denomina tiene muchísimas variantes, pero una de las más difundidas explica que proviene del quechua, punchu, con el mismo significado. Otra versión la relaciona con punchaw (día en quechua), como una analogía entre el amanecer de un nuevo día y la acción de emerger la cabeza a través del tajo del poncho.
PORORÓ.
Si algo destaca al maíz y a sus distintas preparaciones en todo el mundo, especialmente en Latinoamérica, es la gran cantidad de voces que lo nombran. Lo que en Buenos Aires se conoce como pochoclo y en otros países son rosetas de maíz; en Misiones, Corrientes, Entre Ríos, Chaco, Formosa y Santa Fe se le llama pororó. Esta palabra encuentra su origen en el guaraní. Es que los nativos le decían pororó a todo aquello que generaba un sonido estruendoso y, como es sabido, la preparación de este alimento, provoca la idea de pequeñas explosiones.
TANGO.
El tango es uno de nuestros géneros musicales y de danza más tradicionales. Sin embargo, la etimología de su nombre es objeto de fuertes controversias. Hay quienes dicen que el término proviene de tangomao, un africanismo con el que se definía a los traficantes de esclavos en la época colonial. De este modo, en América se llamó tango a los sitios donde se reunían los africanos para bailar y cantar. Otra teoría señala que el mismo vocablo entró en la segunda mitad del siglo XIX, desde Cuba y Andalucía, para denominar un género musical que en el Río de la Plata adquirió su propia idiosincrasia.
TENER LA VACA ATADA.
“Vos tenés la vaca atada”, le decimos a quien disfruta de un garantizado bienestar económico. El dicho nace en el siglo XIX, cuando en la Argentina se impuso el modelo agroexportador y muchos estancieros se enriquecieron gracias a la vasta cantidad de hectáreas que podían explotar. En aquellos tiempos, era común que los nuevos ricos viajaran a Europa con sus familias. Era costumbre que también llevaran a su personal de servicio y una vaca para obtener la leche para sus hijos durante el viaje. El animal tenía que viajar sujeto en un rincón de la bodega del barco. Esa es la famosa vaca atada.
TILINGO.
Hay palabras que, como si se tratara de una moda, aparecen y desaparecen del uso cotidiano según el contexto histórico. Es el caso de tilingo, la expresión popularizada por Arturo Jauretche, quien la instaló en el habla de los argentinos como un adjetivo para calificar a las personas que se preocupan por cosas insignificantes y ambicionan pertenecer a una clase social más alta. Además, este pensador emblemático del siglo XX actualizó el empleo de cipayo e introdujo los términos vendepatria y medio pelo.
TIRAR MANTECA AL TECHO.
Seguramente más de una vez le habrás dicho a alguien: “Dejá de tirar manteca al techo”. El giro busca expresar la idea de un gasto ostentoso e innecesario y su origen se ubica en la Buenos Aires de 1920. Por entonces, los jóvenes adinerados se divertían en los restaurantes de moda arrojando rulitos de manteca con el tenedor. Le apuntaban al techo y el objetivo era competir para ver quién era capaz de dejar pegados más trozos al cielo raso, o cuál de todos se mantenía adherido por más tiempo. Una práctica absurda de la que, afortunadamente, solo nos queda la expresión cotidiana.
TODO BICHO QUE CAMINA VA A PARAR AL ASADOR.
Tomado del Martín Fierro, el libro de José Hernández icono de la literatura gauchesca, este refrán se basa en la idea de que cualquier animal se presta para ser asado y comido. Sabido es que en la Argentina amamos los asados y todo el ritual que los envuelve. Pero, además, con el tiempo el dicho “Todo bicho que camina va a parar al asador” evolucionó sumando otros significados. Durante las décadas del 40 y 50, la frase fue utilizada también para hacer alusión a las cosas o personas cuyas acciones tienen un final previsible.
TRUCHO.
Desde hace algunas décadas es un término de uso ineludible en nuestro lenguaje cotidiano. Para los argentinos, las cosas falsas, tramposas o de mala calidad son truchas. Y dentro de esa categoría entran también las personas fraudulentas. Deriva de la palabra truchimán, muy común en el español antiguo y que refiere a personas sin escrúpulos. El empleo de trucho se hizo popular en 1986 cuando, a raíz de la crisis ecológica causada por algunas empresas en el río Paraná, el periodista Lalo Mir comentó en su programa radial que los funcionarios debían dar la trucha (cara) porque si no eran unos truchos.
VAGO.
Córdoba tiene su propia tonada, su propia forma de hablar y, claro, su modo particular para usar las palabras. En cualquier otra región, el término vago hace referencia a alguien perezoso, a un holgazán que nunca tiene ganas de hacer nada. Pero en esta provincia, vago puede ser cualquiera. Es que la palabra se utiliza para dirigirse a otra persona en forma totalmente desenfadada. Así, una frase como “El vago ese quiere trabajar todo el día” no encierra ninguna contradicción si es pronunciada dentro de los límites del territorio cordobés.
VIVA LA PEPA.
Contra lo que pudiese creerse, `viva la Pepa` no es el grito de alegría de un buscador de oro, sino el que usaban los liberales españoles en adhesión a la Constitución de Cádiz, promulgada el 19 de marzo de 1812, en la festividad de San José Obrero. Como a los José se los apoda Pepe, en vez de decir `viva la Constitución` -lo que conllevaba llegar a ser reprimidos- los liberales gritaban `viva la Pepa`. Hoy, en Argentina, su significado se ha desvirtuado y se parece a `piedra libre`.
YETA.
Significa mala suerte y se cree que deriva de las palabras napolitanas jettatura (mal de ojos) y jettatore (hombre maléfico que con su presencia produce daño a los demás). En 1904 se estrenó la obra ¡Jettatore!, de Gregorio de Laferrere, sobre un hombre con un aura funesta, y, desde entonces, los supersticiosos mantienen viva la palabra yeta. Por ejemplo, se emplea la expresión “¡Qué yeta!” en lugar de “¡Qué mala suerte!” ante una situación desafortunada. También se dice que alguien es yeta cuando se sospecha que trae mala suerte o que está enyetado cuando todo le sale mal.
ZAMBA.
No hay que confundir zamba, género folklórico argentino, con samba, música popular brasileña. Porque el simple cambio de una letra nos puede hacer viajar de una cultura a otra. La historia cuenta que durante la conquista española se denominaba zambo al hijo varón de un negro con una indígena. Por extensión, la música y la danza de esta comunidad pasó a llamarse zamba, ya que las coplas que se cantaban iban dirigidas a las mujeres. Esta danza proviene de la zamacueca peruana que, al llegar a la Argentina, incorporó el pañuelo como elemento característico.
submitted by Pepe-Argento to argentina [link] [comments]

Reformas Casino Santa Fe - YouTube Casino Santa Fe - YouTube Casino Santa Fe - YouTube Instructivo Craps  Casino Santa Fe - YouTube Las calles de SANTA FE...PROSTITUTION IN BOGOTA! Nightlife ... Popular Videos - Casino Santa Fe & Poker - YouTube VÍDEO promocional casino BIG BOLA SANTA FE - YouTube

casino : Habilitaron el Casino de Santa Fe con el 50% de las máquinas y horarios reducidos, With games starting at just $1—and the largest $1 Jumbo Keno Progressive—winning big has never been easier or more affordable than it is with Stations Casino keno at Santa Fe. Join us in our inviting 20-seat keno lounge for an intimate setting and personalized service—or play keno at Grand Cafe while you enjoy a mouthwatering meal. DIQUE I PUERTO DE SANTA FE (3000) Santa Fe 54-342 450-2800. Casino Santa Fe; Melincué Casino & Resort; Salto Hotel & Casino; Rivera Casino & Resort Santa Fe Poker all over the place and make several different Santa Fe Poker deposits. We always recommend looking around at various real money online casino options as you never know what might catch your eye. New content is always being created so Santa Fe Poker let us take care of the hard work finding you Santa Fe Poker the best options for ... De este modo podrán abrir el Casino Puerto Santa Fe, Casino de Rosario y Casino Melincué, cumpliendo estrictamente las medidas sanitarias básicas como la distancia mínima de dos metros entre personas y la restricción del uso de las superficies cerradas permitiendo como máximo el uso del 50 % de su capacidad. Respecto a la operatoria del casino, en principio sólo funcionarán algunos ... Best Casinos in Santa Fe, NM - We enjoyed the restaurant at Camel Rock, the previous Tesuque Casino. We ate in this newer restaurant, and we noticed the prices are almost twice, but the portion are a lot smaller. Food is still pretty good, but we won't be back. Best Casino Hotels in Santa Fe on Tripadvisor: Find 4,925 traveler reviews, 2,227 candid photos, and prices for casino hotels in Santa Fe, NM. El Casino de Santa Fe estará abierto de 8:30 a 13 horas de lunes a jueves, y viernes y sábados de 8:30 a 13:30 horas, trabajando con un grupo reducido de personas. Embed . airedesantafe · Habilitaron el Casino de Santa Fe con el 50% de las máquinas. Lo que se lee ahora. Santa Fe . Desde la EPE advierten que hay un retraso muy importante en las tarifas en Santa Fe. las más leídas. Santa ... With a coveted showroom and intimate lounges—Santa Fe Station is host to incredible entertainment offerings. But after-hours fun isn’t our only speciality. Here, you’ll find an on-site movie theatre, a 60-lane bowling alley & the only in-casino supervised childcare center in Northwest Vegas. Casino Santa Fé, Santa Fe. Südamerika ; Argentinien ; Litoral ; Provinz Santa Fe ; Santa Fe ; Sehenswürdigkeiten und Aktivitäten in Santa Fe ; Casino Santa Fé ; Suchen. Casino Santa Fé. 174 Bewertungen. Nr. 4 von 62 Aktivitäten in Santa Fe. Kasinos. Leider sind an den von Ihnen gewählten Daten keine Touren oder Aktivitäten verfügbar. Bitte geben Sie ein anderes Datum ein. Casino ...

[index] [31430] [22526] [16149] [20773] [950] [10185] [14608] [4182] [14756] [15253]

Reformas Casino Santa Fe - YouTube

The Rueda Project in Santa Fe - ArgentinaOrganizer: Sonia BoimvaserPlace: Bar Bowling El Clasico - Club SocialHipólito Yrigoyen 3179, S3000 Santa FePhone:034... Instructivo sobre Craps del Casino Santa Fe video sobre reformas del casino santa fe, técnica acuarelas Las calles de SANTA FE...Bogota zona de PROSTITUCION...NightlifeEn esta aventura les estare mosntrando la zona de tolerancia en bogota colombia. Como es esta... Dios...!! Se persigna y toca la maquina para que le de suerte... QUE VIEJA PELOTUDA...!! Casino Santa Fe mucho más que un Casino, mucha más diversión para vos... Grabando VIDEO interno para casinos Big bola Cotizaciones y contacto : 5533996186 Email: [email protected] Creamos cualquier tipo de show y temática "Lo h... Este maravilloso western, obra maestra del género, narra la historia del joven teniente Jeb Stuart (Errol Flynn), recién graduado de la academia military de ... Casino Santa Fe - Topic; About; Home

https://bitcoin-casino-baccarat.forexgridtrading.pw